At first I was going to post this story from the UK Telegraph as an interesting piece... food for thought if you will... with the tag that this tangent has little to do with the financial world we deal with.  But upon further reflection, as we've sat posting story upon story for multiple years about hapless victims and don't blame me and bail me out, I see this piece has everything to do with finance.  Because the reality is *this* mess, and our response to the mess (sacrifice the savers, hug the debtors / spenders) comes from a much deeper root cause; one that apparently is not being admitted in the Anglo Saxon world.  (I'm excluding the Canadians who still seem like a polite people who do not toss each other under the bus)

I will let you read the whole post if interested here, but an excerpt below - if nothing else, it makes you think.

Litter is annoying, but in the grand scheme of a society that has traded personal responsibility for blame transfer, it is little more than a pointer to a deeper malaise: the corrosion of deference in our schools, the abandonment of manners on our streets and, yes, the death of respect for civility and integrity. We are close to the point where ethical behaviour is regarded as an affliction to be pitied, a loser's burden.

In a piercing summary of what has gone wrong, Britain's Chief Rabbi, Lord Sacks, concludes: Concepts like duty, obligation, responsibility and honour have come to seem antiquated and irrelevant. Emotions like guilt, shame, contrition and remorse have been deleted from our vocabulary, for are we not all entitled to self-esteem? The still, small voice of conscience is rarely heard these days. Conscience has been outsourced, delegated away.

Indeed it has. Individual wrongdoings are, increasingly, an issue not for those concerned, but the state, which dishes out rights in return for unquestioning obeisance. In place of self-restraint, we have installed an all-embracing culture of grievance. Culprits have learnt to claim victim status.