Republican presidential hopeful Mike Huckabee indicated Friday that he would not be averse to deploying troops or the FBI to stop abortions from being carried out in the United States. The candidate, speaking during a campaign tour in Iowa, said he would invoke constitutional protections on human life in order to see an end to the practice, the Topeka Capital-Journal reported.

“Would that be a huge controversy?” the former Arkansas governor asked. “Yes.”

He argued the Supreme Court 1973 Roe v. Wade decision, which ruled against bans on abortion, was made at a time when insufficient scientific information was available about unborn babies. The candidate, who formerly served as governor of Arkansas, alleged that it has been verified that unborn babies are human beings.




“I will not pretend there is nothing we can do to stop this,” Huckabee said at the Iowa event.

Asked by a reporter whether he would consider deploying the FBI or federal forces to crack down on abortion, Huckabee responded: "We’ll see if I get to be president.”

The presidential candidate, who stepped down as host of his own talk show at Fox News after announcing he would enter the 2016 presidential race, is considered a staunch social conservative and has run much of his campaign on social issues. "God hasn't put me on Earth just to have a good time or to make a good living," the presidential contender said as he ended his show. "God has put me on Earth to try to make a good life."

Huckabee ran a competitive campaign in 2008, but he failed to compete with Sen. John McCain for the nomination. In a recent poll, Huckabee was placed in a four-way tie for fourth place with Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky, pediatric neurosurgeon Ben Carson and Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida, Politico reported.

Abortion has reemerged as a significant topic in recent weeks after three videos surfaced that anti-abortion groups claim show the illegal sale of fetal tissue by Planned Parenthood. Several bills have been introduced to Congress to cut funding for the organization, at a time when the organization has experienced several cyber attacks amid increased criticism.