Stock market trader Alessio Rastani commented on the current economic crisis to the BBC on Monday, saying, Governments don't rule the world but rather Goldman Sachs does and he dreams of another recession.

This is not a time right now for wishful thinking that governments are going to sort things out, Rastani told the BBC. The governments don't rule the world, Goldman Sachs rules the world.

In a candid interview about the Eurozone rescue plan, Rastani said the market is ruled by fear and cannot be saved by the rescue plan.

They know the stock market is toast, he said. They know the stock market is finished.

Rastani said most investors are moving their money to places it would be more safe, like U.S. treasuries and the dollar, as they simply do not care about the state of the economy but rather about their own pockets.

Personally it doesn't matter, he said. See I'm a trader. I don't really care about that kind of stuff. If I see an opportunity to make money, I go with that.

Rastani continued on to say that most other traders, like him, are not interested in the climate of the economy but only care about making money.

For most traders...we don't really care that much about how they're going to fix the economy, how they're going to fix the whole situation, Rastani said. Our job is to make money from it.

Finding optimism in a grim situation, Rastani said he's been dreaming of this moment for years.

I go to bed every night, I dream of another recession, he said.

Rastani continued to proclaim his sentiments regarding the world financial crisis, which he compared to cancer, for three and a half minutes as the interview with BBC continued.

In the final moments, after dropping the comment about Goldman Sachs, independent trader Alessio Rastani gave some advice to the viewers.

The first thing people should do is protect their assets, he said. Because in less than twelve months, my prediction is the savings of millions of people are going to vanish.

View the video below to see Alessio Rastani's interview with BBC.