Human rights lawyer Amal Clooney looked chic in an all-black ensemble on Tuesday when she visited the high-security Maafushi prison to meet the former Maldives president Mohamed Nasheed.

She was dressed in her simple black suit and skirt combination. The 37-year-old paired her short skirt with sand colored pumps. Her shoes are by Paul Andrew. The Zenedia sand patent leather pumps are unfortunately not available to buy.

Her accessories included small pearl drop earrings and a white handbag with black and white patterned border. Clooney also kept her make-up subtle for the occasion with a slick of pink on her lips. Her brunette tresses were styled into a side part with curls and her favorite bouncy blowout.

With her smart outfit, she teamed up an Elizabeth and James sunglasses to protect herself from the sun. She wore the same pair of Smith sunglasses on Monday. The angular frame creates a cat eye-inspired silhouette on these sleek, modern glares.

The lawyer had a two-hour meeting with Nasheed after traveling to the Maaafushi prison. She had to wait for some time before she got to meet him.  

Speaking to the press after the meeting, Clooney said that the former president was in “remarkably good spirits” and that his message to the Maldivian people was to “remain hopeful that things will improve.” The barrister also said that she would be attending meetings with the government on his behalf.

The barrister’s meeting took place a day before the Maldives high court hearing over Nasheed’s terrorism conviction. Clooney, who is married to Hollywood heartthrob George Clooney, reached the island nation on Monday to press for the release of the former president.

Clooney is part of the high-profile legal team representing Nasheed. Her visit to the honeymoon island comes days after his local lawyer Mahfooz Saeed was stabbed by an unknown attacker in Male on Friday. Clooney’s visit to the country is to press for the release of the former leader, who was sentenced to a 13-year imprisonment in March.

Nasheed was elected president in 2008 and was sentenced in March under a tough anti-terror law. His trial was criticized by the United Nations, U.S. and human rights groups which termed it as “deeply flawed”.