Amber Portwood, one of the troubled stars of MTV's Teen Mom is headed to court-ordered rehab following a hearing on Monday.

The reality star is in trouble for probation violation as well as a drug violation. According to E! News, in December authorities found prescription medication in Portwood's purse for which she had no prescription. Portwood was sentenced at the time to two years for her probation violation and three years for the drug violation. But for now it looks like Portwood might be able to avoid jail time. The sentence was stayed, or put off, to see if any further developments will affect her case. Currently, Portwood has the chance to attend a drug rehabilitation program.

Portwood is still in custody until Thursday, when the court will decide if the drug rehab program is a suitable option for the troubled reality star. If accepted, Portwood would enter the program immediately, but would be allowed to live with her mother.

According to E! News, the minimum sentence for Portwood's drug program would be 18 months, with the maximum being three years. Any failure to complete or participate in the program could send the teen mom to jail for five years.

Portwood has the opportunity to withdraw her guilty pleas, if the drug court does not find the drug rehabilitation program to be suitable. If the guilty pleas are withdrawn, Portwood will have a trial for her probation violation and drug possession charges.

In 2010, Portwood was charged with domestic violence stemming from footage shown on MTV that highlighted the teen mom attacking Gary Shirley, the father of her toddler. Shirley was slapped in front of their daughter, and also received several punches to the face and upper body from Portwood,

Jenelle Evans, another star of MTV's Teen Mom has also been in the spotlight for trouble with the law. Evans was arrested twice in one week this past January. The first arrest was made after she allegedly made harassing phone calls and threats to Hannah Inman, a former roommate. TMZ reported that Evans second arrest was due to violating a domestic-violence protective order.