Annie George: NY Woman Accused of Keeping Illegal Immigrant from India as Servant

 
on March 02 2012 6:29 AM

A New York woman, who lives in a 34-room mansion, has been arrested for keeping an illegal immigrant as a servant who was made to work 17 hours a day, seven days a week and was paid about 85 cents an hour.

A New York woman, who owns a 34-room mansion, was arrested for keeping an illegal immigrant as a servant, who was made to work 17 hours a day, seven days a week, and was paid about 85 cents an hour.

Federal authorities accused Annie George, 39, of breaking immigration rules by keeping the Indian woman as a servant in a forced labor situation for six years. A nine-page complaint has been filed against her.

George from Rexford forced the Indian woman from the state of Kerala, identified only as V.M., to overstay her visa, according to court documents. V.M. was employed as a domestic servant previously with a family who worked for the UN.

George, who lives in a 30,000 sq. ft. mansion, promised the Indian woman to pay $1,000 a month in 2005. But she was paid only 85 cents an hour that amounted to around $29,000 altogether while her actual remuneration should have been about $206,000.

The complaint against George is supported by an affidavit from Daria Botten, special agent for Immigration and Customs Enforcement Homeland Security Investigations.

The affidavit said that V.M. recounted asking George and her husband to let her return to India, but George told her that she lacked the necessary immigration documents and brought her to see an attorney. Later George deducted $4,000 from her salary, but she never got the documents. The 39-year-old woman is also known as Annie Kolath and Sajimol George.

The George family was in the news in June 2009 when her husband George George, also known as George Kolath, and eldest son died in a plane crash.

George, also known as Annie Kolath and Sajimol George, was released on her own recognizance after an initial court appearance this week, Associated Press reported.

She did not leave the premises. She was not paid the monies that she was owed and her freedom to move around was restricted, CBS News reported quoting immigration attorney, Leslie Thiele.

According to investigators, V.M. told them through a Hindi-speaking translator that she communicated with George, her husband and other family members in Malayalam, an Indian language common to the Kerala region of India, where she and the couple are from, Associated Press reported.

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