Steve Jobs famously left Apple for nearly a decade in the 90s, but when he returned, he not only helped revive the company he founded, he also donated a trove of Apple documents and photos to Stanford University's Silicon Valley Archives. In 1997, Stanford took charge of what was to become an Apple museum, and turned two truckloads of books, software, videotapes and more into Stanford's Apple Collection.

Through this one collection you can trace out the evolution of the personal computer, Stanford historian Leslie Berlin told the Associated Press. These sorts of documents are as close as you get to the The materials are stored in an off-campus storage facility, and the hundreds of boxes consume over 600 feet of shelf space there.

Some highlights: Large collection of photos by Doublas Menuez, documenter of Jobs while he was at NeXT Computer, the company he started in 1985 after leaving Apple. There's a company video clowning the movie 'Ghostbusters,' and it depicts Jobs and other Apple workers as Blue Busters. Blue (or Big Blue) being a common name for Apple's rival IBM. Early sales of the Apple II, one of the very first widely available desktop computers, were cataloged in handwritten financial records, and they've survived to make it into the collection. There's an $5,000 loan agreement from 1976 to Jobs, Wozniak and Ronald Wayne who left the company after less than a month. There's even a letter from 1976 from a printer who had met the Apple team, and he tells his peers to watch out for the young business men. This joker (Jobs) is going to be calling you ... They are two guys, they build kits, operate out of a garage.

Since Jobs' death in October 2011, his biography has been on the bestseller list nearly every week and the iPhone 4S has been Apple's best selling device ever. The Apple Collection is not up for full display yet, but parts of it can be found at the Green Library on Stanford's campus in Palo Alto, Calif. Let us know in the comments if you are an Apple buff.