Apple Vs. Samsung Lawsuit: How The Tech Giants Responded To The $1 Billion Verdict [Full List Of Infringed Products]

 @KukilBora
on August 25 2012 1:30 AM
Apple vs. Samsung Lawsuit
Scoring a huge victory over its archrival Samsung on Friday, Apple had the last laugh in the epic Apple v. Samsung patent-infringement lawsuit and was awarded $1.051 billion in damages by a U.S. jury. Here's what both Samsung and Apple said following the verdict. Also find the list of the patents involved in the lawsuit and the devices that were found to infringe on those patents. Reuters

Apple had the last laugh in its epic Apple v. Samsung patent-infringement lawsuit and was awarded $1.051 billion in damages by a California jury.  

Following the verdict in the long-running patent lawsuit, both Samsung and Apple issued statements.

Here's what Samsung said in its statement:

"Today's verdict should not be viewed as a win for Apple, but as a loss for the American consumer. It will lead to fewer choices, less innovation and potentially higher prices. It is unfortunate that patent law can be manipulated to give one company a monopoly over rectangles with rounded corners, or technology that is being improved every day by Samsung and other companies. Consumers have the right to choices, and they know what they are buying when they purchase Samsung products. This is not the final word in this case or in battles being waged in courts and tribunals around the world, some of which have already rejected many of Apple's claims. Samsung will continue to innovate and offer choices for the consumer."

Apple, on the other hand, was very pleased with the ruling and said it did the company justice. Apple spokeswoman Katie Cotton told the New York Times the following:

"We are grateful to the jury for their service and for investing the time to listen to our story, and we were thrilled to be able to finally tell it. The mountain of evidence presented during the trial showed that Samsung's copying went far deeper than even we knew. The lawsuits between Apple and Samsung were about much more than patents or money. They were about values. At Apple, we value originality and innovation and pour our lives into making the best products on earth. We make these products to delight our customers, not for our competitors to flagrantly copy. We applaud the court for finding Samsung's behavior willful and for sending a loud and clear message that stealing isn't right."

Apple CEO Tim Cook also issued a statement. Here's what Cook said, as quoted by 9TO5Mac:

"Today was an important day for Apple and for innovators everywhere.

Many of you have been closely following the trial against Samsung in San Jose for the past few weeks. We chose legal action very reluctantly and only after repeatedly asking Samsung to stop copying our work.

We owe a debt of gratitude to the jury, who invested their time in listening to our story. We were thrilled to finally have the opportunity to tell it. The mountain of evidence presented during the trial showed that Samsung's copying went far deeper than we knew.

The jury has now spoken. We applaud them for finding Samsung's behavior willful and for sending a loud and clear message that stealing isn't right.

I am very proud of the work that each of you do.

Today, values have won and I hope the whole world listens.

Tim"

The nine-person jury at the U.S. District Court in San Jose, Calif., decided that a number of Android-run products from the South Korean tech giant violated quite a few of Apple's design and utility patents. And according to Reuters, Friday's verdict "could lead to an outright ban on sales of key Samsung products" that would further strengthen Apple's dominance in the growing mobile computing market.

Take a look at the list of the patents (see below) involved in the lawsuit and the devices that were found to infringe on those patents. (via CNET)

'381 patent: This patent includes the "rubber band" effect that makes a page bounce when a user scrolls to the bottom, touch-screen actions like dragging documents and multi-touch capabilities like pinch to zoom and twist to rotate.

  •  Captivate
  •  Continuum
  •  Droid Charge
  •  Epic 4G
  •  Exhibit 4G
  •  Fascinate
  •  Galaxy Ace
  •  Galaxy Prevail
  •  Galaxy S
  •  Galaxy S 4G
  •  Galaxy S II (AT&T)
  •  Galaxy S II (unlocked)
  •  Galaxy Tab
  •  Galaxy Tab 10.1
  •  Gem
  •  Indulge
  •  Infuse 4G
  •  Mesmerize
  •  Nexus s 4G
  •  Replenish
  •  Vibrant

'915 patent: This patent is related to the capability that allows a device differentiate between a single-touch scroll operation and a multi-touch pinch-to-zoom operation.

  •  Captivate
  •  Continuum
  •  Droid Charge
  •  Epic 4G
  •  Exhibit 4G
  •  Fascinate
  •  Galaxy Prevail
  •  Galaxy S
  •  Galaxy S 4G
  •  Galaxy S II (AT&T)
  •  Galaxy S II (T-Mobile)
  •  Galaxy S II (unlocked)
  •  Galaxy Tab
  •  Galaxy Tab 10.1
  •  Gem
  •  Indulge
  •  Infuse 4G
  •  Mesmerize
  •  Nexus S 4G
  •  Transform
  •  Vibrant

'163 patent: This patent covers the capability that double-tapping a touch screen to enlarge and center portions of a Web page, photo, or document offers.

  •  Droid Charge
  •  Epic 4G
  •  Exhibit 4G
  •  Fascinate
  •  Galaxy Ace
  •  Galaxy Prevail
  •  Galaxy S
  •  Galaxy S 4G
  •  Galaxy S II (AT&T)
  •  Galaxy S II (T-Mobile)
  •  Galaxy S II (unlocked)
  •  Galaxy Tab
  •  Galaxy Tab 10.1
  •  Infuse 4G
  •  Mesmerize
  •  Replenish

D '677 patent: This patent covers the front face of an electronic device, as in the case of the iPhone.

  •  Epic 4G
  •  Fascinate
  •  Galaxy S
  •  Galaxy S Showcase
  •  Galaxy S II (AT&T)
  •  Galaxy S II (T-Mobile)
  •  Galaxy S II (Unlocked)
  •  Galaxy S II Skyrocket
  •  Infuse 4G
  •  Mesmerize
  •  Vibrant

D '087 patent: This patent is related to the "ornamental" design of a phone.

  •  Galaxy
  •  Galaxy S 4G
  •  Vibrant

D '305 patent: This patent is related to the grid of rounded square icons against a black background.

  •  Captivate
  •  Continuum
  •  Droid Charge
  •  Epic 4G
  •  Fascinate
  •  Galaxy S
  •  Galaxy S 4G
  •  Galaxy Showcase
  •  Gem
  •  Indulge
  •  Infuse 4G
  •  Mesmerize
  •  Vibrant

When it comes to the D '889 patent, covering the industrial design of a tablet computer, the jury decided that both the Wi-Fi and 4G LTE versions of the Galaxy Tab 10.1 didn't infringe on Apple patents.

Take a look at the jury document below:

Apple v. Samsung verdict form

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