Bill Cosby's plan to educate teens about the dangers of sexual misconduct was slammed by attorney Gloria Allred on Thursday, saying the comedian's tour was aimed at influencing the jury pool in his Andrea Constand trial. Cosby, whose sexual assault trial recently ended in a mistrial, is likely to face a second criminal trial.

"Mr. Cosby's so called workshops appear to be a transparent and slick effort to attempt to influence the jury pool from which jurors will be selected for his second criminal trial. Mr. Cosby should understand, however, that this is not about optics. It is about evidence and according to news reports at least 10 jurors out of 12 voted to convict him on one felony count," Allred, who represents several women who have accused the favorite TV dad of assaulting and drugging them decades ago, said in a statement to ABC News. "Under the circumstances Mr. Cosby should not be conducting sex assault workshops, but if he does do them then the best advice he can give to those attending is that if you do not drug and sexually assault women, then you need not worry about being charged with a crime."

Read: Panel Was Leaning Towards Convicting Bill Cosby On Two Counts, Report Suggests

Twitter exploded with reactions Thursday after Andrew Wyatt, a spokesman for Cosby, revealed the news during an interview with an Alabama news station. The 79-year-old actor is preparing himself to host a series of such "town hall" meetings with youths where he would discuss how to avoid sexual assault. Wyatt told WBRC Fox 6 News that one of the meetings will be in Birmingham, "sometime in July."

"We're going to talk to young people because this is bigger than Bill Cosby," Wyatt said. "This issue can affect any young person, especially young athletes of today, and they need to know what they're facing when they're hanging out and partying, when they're doing certain things that they shouldn't be doing."

Wyatt said the decision was made after several organizations, including churches, contacted the comedian to "come out and speak to young men and women on how this could affect their lives."

"This is bigger than Mr. Cosby now. ... Mr. Cosby is going to go out and use his voice, to let it be heard, and to try to educate young men and women on how to avoid this because they do not have the wealth of resources that he has," Wyatt said. "But I think that he can give them some direction." Wyatt also said the tour would educate people on what constitutes an allegation of sexual assault — something that not many people are aware of.

Read: Gloria Allred Net Worth

"You could walk in a baseball game, a crowded baseball game, and you could bump up against a female, touch her butt or her breasts by accident and that's sexual assault," Wyatt said.

Judge Steven T. O'Neill declared a mistrial Saturday in Cosby’s criminal trial, for which jurors had been deadlocked after deliberating since June 12. Montgomery County District Attorney Kevin R. Steel, who has held the position since 2016, announced he will be retrying the case now.