Model Jasmine Fiore (L) is shown with reality TV star Ryan Alexander Jenkins in the pool at a hotel in Las Vegas in this image taken August 3, 2009 and released by celebrity website REUTERS/Courtesy TMZ/Handout

The woman who helped reality TV contestant Ryan Jenkins get a motel room where the accused murderer killed himself is not considered a threat to public, Canadian police said on Monday.

Police know who the woman is and can contact her if needed, but said it was too early to say yet if she would be face any charges for helping Jenkins hide in Canada after he fled the United States with police in pursuit.

This is not someone that we feel is a risk to the public, Sgt. Duncan Pound, a spokesman for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, told reporters in Hope, British Columbia, where Jenkins' body was discovered on Sunday.

Jenkins was accused by U.S. authorities with killing his former wife, Jasmine Fiore, a bikini model whose mutilated body was found just over a week ago in a suitcase, stuffed into a trash bin in the town of Buena Park outside Los Angeles.

Jenkins apparently hanged himself in his motel room in the town of Hope, in southern British Columbia. His body was discovered on Sunday by the motel manager.

Staff and guests at the Thunderbird motel said a woman, described as a young blond, drove Jenkins to the motel on Thursday and paid for the room. She left shortly after the two checked in and was not seen again.

The specifics regarding her movement, the way in which they ended up at the motel together, we're not going to discuss at this time, Pound said.

Jenkins appeared in the television show Megan Wants A Millionaire on VH1, which premiered after completing production in March. Airing of the program has been canceled because of Fiore's death.

Jenkins, who is from Calgary, Alberta, was among 17 men described as millionaires who competed for the affections of former Playboy model Megan Hauserman. When introduced on the show, he was said to have a net worth of $2.5 million.

Jenkins father told the Calgary Sun newspaper that his son died frightened and alone, unable to contact his family because the phones lines were tapped.

He didn't get to talk to anybody, Dan Jenkins said in a story posted on the newspaper's website.

Fiore's mother, Lisa Lepore, told ABC television that Jenkins took the easy way out by killing himself.