Carbon Sciences Inc. is a California based company that has developed, and is in the process of patenting, a breakthrough technology that may hold a key to U.S. energy independence, while turning concerns about greenhouse gases upside down.

Specifically, Carbon Sciences has come up with an effective way to transform greenhouse gases into gasoline (as well as diesel and jet fuel). The carbon dioxide based gas-to-liquid (GTL) technology is a highly scalable clean-tech process that uses CO2 and natural gas as a resource to produce the longer-chain hydrocarbons commonly found in transportation fuels. The company believes the process could generate 140 billion gallons of gasoline each year. From both natural and man-made sources such as natural gas fields, refinery flare gas, landfill gas, municipal waste, and even algae and biomass, there is an abundant supply of cheap feedstock to produce large and sustainable quantities of liquid fuel, replacing equal amounts of petroleum.

Carbon Sciences CEO, Byron Elton, emphasizes the importance of GTL to energy independence. “The crisis that our country faces is how to obtain the quantities of liquid fuel required to maintain our standard of living and drive future growth without using petroleum, foreign or domestic. The EIA predicts that world energy consumption will skyrocket 49 percent over the next 25 years. Of all the alternative fuel technologies under development, GTL technology is the only one with the ability to significantly replace petroleum and provide the nearly 140 billion gallons of gasoline we use each year. The use of natural gas and carbon dioxide as the feedstock for our transportation fuels offers significant advantages over petroleum. The U.S. has over 2,000 trillion cubic feet of known, but unexplored, natural gas reserves. Our CO2-based GTL technology, when fully commercialized, can be used to produce enough gasoline for the U.S. for 47 years without competing with current natural gas consumption of 25 trillion cubic feet, and without using a teaspoon of oil.”

For more information, visit the Carbon Sciences’ website at www.carbonsciences.com.