A tattoo artist in Orlando testified, Tuesday, that Casey Anthony visited his shop to inscribe the words Bella Vita on her body on July 15, 2008 - the same day 2-year old Caylee was reported missing to the police.

Bobby Williams of Cast Iron Tattoos said he inscribed Casey with two Italian words “Bella Vita” on her left shoulder blade, which means beautiful life. Prosecutors say Casey inscribed the tattoo to celebrate her freedom brought about through caylee's death.

Williams said Casey spent about 30 minutes at the shop, while he was working on her tattoo.

During the procedure, she seemed normal and looked happy. She seemed normal, Williams said. She didn't seem upset about anything, she seemed happy for the most part.

He also testified that Casey spent a lot of time on talking on the phone. She even ordered a pizza that she shared with him, and paid $65 in cash for the tattoo.

Because William had known Casey for seven years, he also talked about Caylee on that day. Casey said Caylee was with her nanny and that she would be accompanying her on July 19, the day of her next tattoo appointment.

During the cross examination, defense lawyer Jose Baez explained the tattoo “Bella Vita as a tribute to recently-deceased Caylee, who was a beautiful life. Baze asked Williams whether it was customary that some people get tattoos to remember loved ones who have passed? “Yes,” Williams answered. “That is common.”

Except Williams, Catherine Theisen, who is an FBI expert on forensic mitochondrial DNA, also took the witness stand. She said she compared the strand of hair found in Casey's car to cheek swabs from Casey and matched them.

The testing, Theisen said, could not exclude Caylee, Casey, Casey's mother Cindy, her brother Lee Anthony or any maternal uncles as the source of the hair.

Alina Burroughs, a crime scene investigator, testified that she found a quarter-sized heart sticker with a red glittery border stuck on an envelope and a sheet of smaller pink and purple heart-shaped stickers found in a dresser in Casey's bedroom, while she was collecting evidence from the house of the Anthony family. The jurors were showed the photos.

However, during cross examination, Baez said the stamp on envelope under the sticker is only 37 cents, which means it had been there for a long time ago.

Baez also pointed out that the items in the drawer where the heart-shaped stickers were found were from a baby shower scrap book.

Cindy Anthony also took the stand on Tuesday. She was asked to testify about the two canvas laundry bags found by the authorities who searched her home. The prosecutors claim Casey stuffed Caylee's body in a canvas laundry bag and two black plastic garbage bags with yellow ties like the ones found at the Anthony home.

Casey's mother testified that while one bag was used to store the balls Caylee played with, the other was used to keep her stuffed animals until they were moved to a display. She said the latter bag used to be kept between Caylee's bed and the wall, and that she had not seen it since.

Cindy also was asked to recall the length and color of her, Casey's and Caylee's hair at the time of Caylee's disappearance.

The prosecutors are expected to finish their presentation of evidence Wednesday morning. The defense case is set to begin on Thursday.

The prosecutors say Casey chloroformed Caylee and then put duct tape over her nose and mouth, suffocating the girl.

Casey's lawyers claim Caylee was not murdered. They say the toddler accidentally drowned in the family swimming pool and George, Casey's father, helped her keep the death a secret. George has denied the claim.

Caylee was last seen alive on June 16 and it was only on July 15 that she was reported missing to the police. Cindy had alerted the police by calling a 911 dispatcher and saying that she had smelled a dead body in the trunk of Casey's car that was spotted in an impound lot. The car was later towed by authorities for forensic analysis.

Initially, Casey told the police that a babysitter had abducted Caylee. Investigations showed Casey was lying as the babysitter Zanny was fictitious. Five months later, in December 2008, Caylee's decomposed skeletal remains were found in a wooded area near Casey's house by a meter reader who was relieving himself.

Casey has been charged with seven counts, including first degree murder, aggravated child abuse and misleading the police in the death of Caylee. If she is convicted of first degree, she could be sentenced to death by the seven-woman, five-man jury.