Moldova was set to take another shot at ending a two-year political deadlock and electing a president on December 16 when a centre-left politician, who has already stood twice and failed, officially re-registered as a candidate.

The small ex-Soviet republic elects its head of state by parliament, not by popular vote, but its last attempt to choose a president on November 18 failed because the governing pro-Europe coalition could not come up with an agreed candidate.

Monday, Marian Lupu, a centre-left member of the Alliance for European Integration, officially presented his documents to be able to seek election Friday.

There are no other candidates for now. But it is by no means certain that even if he is the sole candidate he will muster the support of 61 deputies in parliament required to elect him.

Lupu, a former communist who is acting president, was twice put forward by the Alliance as candidate for president, but each time his election was blocked by his former communist allies in parliament who regard him as a traitor.

The powerful communist opposition holds 42 seats against the Alliance's 59, though if any communists break ranks this time Lupu might just secure election.

Moldova has been without a full-time president since communist leader Vladimir Voronin stepped down in September 2009 after two consecutive terms in office.

The stalemate has slowed down reforms in one of Europe's poorest nations, which relies heavily on wine exports and transfers from migrant labourers working abroad.

Moldova needs stability and must overcome its present political crisis. We must put an end to this blurred situation and begin to work for the good of people, Igor Corman, a Lupu aide, told journalists.

(Reporting by Alexander Tanas; Writing by Richard Balmforth; Editing by Alistair Lyon)