Coconut Detained In Maldives: ‘Black Magic’ Fruit Suspected Of Attempting To Rig Presidential Election

on September 06 2013 1:36 PM
Maldives Coconut
A coconut found near a polling center in the Maldives was thought to contain black magic and was detained by local authorities this week (not pictured). Reuters

Inmates in the Republic of the Maldives have a new cell partner this week, a coconut.

Authorities on the island of Kaafa Atoll reportedly detained a "young" fruit after locals suspected that it may have been used to store black magic. According to a report from the Guardian, the coconut was taken into police custody Tuesday morning after local authorities received reports from students of a “suspicious fruit” located near school grounds, a location where voting for their Presidential election is set to take place Saturday.

According to the report the coconut, one of many frequently used in magical rituals, was thought to contain “black magic” and was placed near the school in an effort to rig the upcoming election. “The four inch coconut had a [Koranic verse] written in Arabic [on it] and was lying on the ground near the school, easy for the public to see,” a source revealed, confirming security will be tightened surrounding the upcoming election. “It was a lesson for islanders not to practice black magic in an attempt to influence voting, and that the polling area would be closely monitored to prevent such activities from occurring,” said the source.

Island Council Vice President Abdul Latheef Ahmed confirmed to Minivan News on Wednesday that since the coconut’s detainment a local “white magician” has examined the fruit and has concluded that the incident was a prank. “The police brought a practitioner to examine the coconut, who said it was a fake," a police source revealed. "Because it’s a fake the police are not worried."

This isn’t the first time “black magic” has been used to attempt to influence voting during election. According to a report from CNM News authorities in Guraidhoo reportedly resisted using their educational facilities as polling stations in July in an effort to combat the magic crisis. School authorities eventually allowed voting to place on school grounds after the National Election Commission assumed responsibility in the event that someone would fall ill after being placed "under a spell."