For the first time since the two embarked on their presidential campaigns, Republican nominee Donald Trump has registered a four-point lead over Democratic rival Hillary Clinton following the Republican National Convention, a new poll has showed.

The Republican National Convention was held at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio from July 18-21, 2016. At the convention, the GOP picked Donald Trump as their official nominee for the presidential election slated for November this year, despite widespread conflict of opinion within the party.

In contrast to last week’s poll where the former Secretary of State was commanding a 2-point lead, a national poll conducted by Morning Consult between July 22-24 shows the construction mogul moving ahead by six points to bring the tally to a 44-40, in favor of the Republican.

Following the convention, which more than half of the voters (53 percent) listened in to, the republicans seem to have been able to consolidate their base with 85 percent of Republicans ready to vote for Trump as compared to the 79 percent from the week before.

Forty-eight percent showed a positive outlook to Trump’s own speech, tied with that of daughter Ivanka’s  where she claimed her father was “color blind and gender neutral.” Trump’s wife Melania did not do as well with her allegedly plagiarized speech as she, along with Texas Senator Ted Cruz, who urged Republicans to vote their “conscience,” received negative ratings.

While 43 percent of the voters said the convention gave them a more favorable impression of the Republican Party, 31 percent adopted a less favorable view of the Democratic Party. Thirty-two percent of the responders identified themselves as Republicans, up from the 30 percent before the convention. For the Democratic Party, the number fell from 37 percent to 33 percent.

The Clinton campaign’s latest challenge comes in the form of Democratic National Committee Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz’s resignation from the position after a massive leaked email showed DNC officials favoring Clinton over her Democratic rival Bernie Sanders.

However, this change in voter intentions may be temporary and in line with the typical edge that a party gains after its convention. With the Democratic National Convention set to commence Monday, the odds may return to side with Clinton.

The survey polled 2,502 registered voters. Morning Consult set a margin of error of plus or minus 2 percentage points.