European officials largely endorsed US President Barack Obama’s call for a reshaping of the Israel-Palestine map by reverting to the borders in place before the Six Day War of 1967.

After the 1967 war, Israel expanded its territory by occupying East Jerusalem, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel also expressed her support of the plan.

I think the proposal of taking the 1967 border and of considering the exchange of territory - considering it and not dogmatically adhering to it - would be a good and manageable path, Merkel told a news conference.

The peace process in the Middle East and the developments in the Arab area are very closely linked.”

Although Germany regards Israel as a strong ally, earlier this year, Merkel urged that Israel agree to Palestinian demands to cease settlement-building in disputed lands.

Similarly, Catherine Ashton, foreign policy chief at the European Union, said she welcomes the important statement delivered by President Obama.

Maja Kocijancic, a spokeswoman for the EU, concurred: We believe [Obama's] actions and objectives find a clear echo in the work the European Union is doing.”

Foreign ministers of Poland, Germany and France also said they agreed with Obama’s idea.

We support [Obama's] courageous message, said Polish Foreign Minister Radoslaw Sikorski.

Barack Obama did what Europe has been trying to convince him to do.

However, Israel Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who is scheduled to meet with Obama in Washington on Friday, reacted negatively to the border proposal, saying that the US government failed to grasp the realities of the Israeli people.