A woman formerly employed by Forever 21 is speaking out after learning that secret footage of her using a unisex employee-only bathroom at a location in Providence, Rhode Island, was shared to multiple pornographic websites. 

The 27-year-old Long Island woman, whose name remains unidentified, filed a $2 million lawsuit against the fast-fashion retailer in November 2017. She reportedly received an anonymous text message from a person named "Rob" regarding private bathroom footage he spotted her in on a porn website, according to WNBC

"I told him there was no way this is possible," the woman said to WNBC. "He then started sending me screen shots of the video. I could clearly see that it was my face and it was me going to the bathroom."

"Who knows how long the camera was there? How many other women have been recorded?" she continued.

The woman filed a report with the Providence Police Department upon discovery of the pornographic footage, but officers that investigated the Providence Place Mall branch did not find a camera. Nonetheless, she intends to hold Forever 21 accountable for the "extreme emotional damages" she's experienced following the incident, Women's Wear Daily reported.

The lawsuit noted that the Providence branch "did not equip the employee locker room with any security system/security features to capture or keep a record of non-store employees and/or other unauthorized persons entering into the area designated as the employee locker room of the employee restroom," according to court documents obtained by WWD.

Forever 21 confirmed to International Business Times in November 2017 that it was "actively investigating" the former employee's allegations. 

"Forever 21 takes the privacy of our team members extremely seriously," a spokesperson for Forever 21 previously said to IBT. "We have zero tolerance for any type of inappropriate behavior, and we are committed to making Forever 21 a safe space for all employees, without exception."

Cameras are prohibited from being placed in locations that are considered to be private, including bathrooms or dressing rooms. Laws against video voyeurism — the illegal recording of an individual in an intimate state — differ by state, however. 

"Rhode Island's video voyeurism laws prohibit the installation or use of visual surveillance devices to record the 'intimate areas' of another person without that other person's knowledge and consent for the purpose of sexual arousal or gratification," Rhode Island law asserts, according to Camera Surveillance Laws. "Additionally, retail stores which sell clothing to the public are prohibited from using video surveillance in dressing rooms."