Four earthquakes of magnitudes 5.8, 4.5 and 4.8 struck southern Guatemala Monday followed by two aftershocks of magnitudes 4.3 and 4.6 early Tuesday.

The four earthquakes struck Guatemala continuously within 90 minutes, shaking buildings in the capital, triggering landslides and killing three people.

The highest magnitude of the four earthquakes was recorded 5.8 on Richter scale that hit Guatemala at a depth of 39.4 km (24.5 miles) on Sept. 19, 2011, at 18:34:00 UTC, according to United States Geological Survey (USGS).

The epicenter of the quake was located at 53 km (32 miles) south east of Guatemala’s capital in Central America.

The two 4.8 magnitudes earthquakes that occurred at 18:00:01 and 19:17:54 UTC were also located around 41 to 51 kilometers south east of Guatemala City.

Location

Location Maps of 4.8 magnitudes earthquakes in Guatemala. PHoto: U.S.G.S

A 4.5 magnitude earthquake that struck at 20:30:04 UTC was found to be located at 60 km (37 miles) east of south east of Escuintla, Guatemala.

Location

Location Maps of 5.8 (L) and 4.5 (R) magnitudes earthquakes in Guatemala. PHoto: U.S.G.S

Cities of Los Esclavos, 65 km (40 miles) from Guatemala City and Cuilapa were affected the most where people were injured and displaced by earthquakes and aftershocks.

Two aftershocks in the region were further reported during the early hours of Sept. 20.

A 4.6 magnitude earthquake occurred at a depth of 24 km (14.9 miles) at 04:28:52 UTC, while another aftershock of magnitude 4.3 struck at a depth of 40.1 km (24.9 miles) at 00:22:52 UTC on Tuesday.

Both the aftereffects were located south east of Guatemala City at about 51 to 64 kilometers.

Location

Location Maps of 4.6 (L) and 4.3 (R) magnitudes aftershocks in Guatemala. PHoto: U.S.G.S
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A man is taken to hospital by paramedics after an aftershock in Los Esclavos, 65 km (40 miles) from Guatemala City, September 19, 2011. REUTERS/Jorge Lopez
Refugees

Refugees arrive at a military zone for people displaced by earthquakes in Cuilapa September 19, 2011. REUTERS/Jorge Lopez