General Environmental Management Inc. announced early this morning the release of a company overview as presented by General Environmental Management, Inc. CEO Timothy J. Koziol. The “State of the Union” style communiqué provides current and prospective shareholders with a complete picture of where the company currently stands in its revised business model to expand from an environmental services only company to an enterprise that begins with the treatment and disposal of non-hazardous wastewater at its subsidiary, Southern California Waste Water (SCWW), and expands to include a full spectrum of environmental services.

Chief Executive Officer of GEM Timothy J. Koziol began the communiqué by stating, “Over the recent months, General Environmental Management has changed direction, company vision, and company profitability. As we evolve into our new business model, we recognize the importance of keeping our shareholders up-to-date. It is with this intention that I present this communiqué to you today.”

“Since 2002, GEM has been providing a premium level of environmental solutions to clients in the Western Region of the United States. While our direction has changed from hazardous waste services to the treatment and disposal of non-hazardous wastewater, we remain vigilant and focused on building shareholder value. Our previous business model focused primarily on environmental services and the management of hazardous waste. Our proprietary software solution, GEMWare, was designed to give GEM and its clients the data needed to efficiently manage regulated waste streams from start to final treatment and disposal.”

“While this business model suited us for a time, and provided the framework to build General Environmental Management, we believed that higher profitability lay in non-hazardous wastewater treatment. Water stands as the 3rd largest industry behind power generation and oil and gas. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, the water and wastewater industry experienced 4%, 2%, and 8% growth in the 1990, 2001, and 2007 recessions respectively. GEM’s Board of Directors decided the Company should change its focus from a purely services based company to an enterprise with a foundation in a fixed based treatment and disposal facility, like SCWW.”

Mr. Koziol continued, “SCWW, a non-hazardous wastewater treatment facility in Santa Paula, California, was our platform. We acquired them and began plans to grow the business organically and develop state-of-the-art systems for operations, sales, compliance, finance, and human resources at SCWW which can then be deployed at other acquired facilities. Our expert staff created a turn-key system sculpted from GEM’s expertise to streamline processes and provide dynamic full spectrum environmental services. Ultimately, GEM aims to establish a nationwide network of wastewater treatment facilities over the next few years, seeking out acquisitions and reformulating them to the GEM standards.”

“Margins from the treatment of hazardous waste were between 5%-10%, mainly due to the costs involved in the final disposal stage at permitted facilities operated by outside sources. Non-hazardous wastewater treatment margins at SCWW by contrast are over 30%. Taking ownership of the final processing plant at SCWW has proven to be the key in securing maximum profitability. Our change of focus has resulted in margins up to eight times greater than those maintained by our hazardous waste services only model. We are excited about our business strategy to push greater volume with a scalability that permits us to grow at a solid pace.”

Koziol added, “The domestic water industry is approximately $120 billion in size, with the global market currently calculated at over $400 billion. The industry is growing each year with increasing demands from industry, government and consumers. In 2009, SCWW gross revenues totaled $6,205,903 with an EBITDA of $1,751,333. In 2010 we expect to see continued growth at SCWW.”

Mr. Timothy Koziol concluded, “The new systems we are developing and deploying at SCWW are turn-key, completely scalable and provide a platform for future growth. Our new business model is also more in tune with the economic landscape of today. The sign of any good company is the ability to not only survive in an economic downturn, but to thrive. As stated previously, we believe that 2010-2011 will be years of enormous growth for GEM.”

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