Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich's top aides have resigned from his presidential campaign, according to reports.

There was a path to victory, Newt had a different path. When that happens the people who work for the campaign have to leave, Rick Tyler, who resigned today as Gingrich's spokesman, told CBS News. I have no regrets. I admire him deeply. I hope he does become president, he said.

Two sources close to the situation said the mass resignation was a team decision.

Nevertheless, Gingrich said he is committed to staying in the race.

I am committed to running the substantive, solutions-oriented campaign I set out to run earlier this spring, he said on his Facebook page. The campaign begins anew Sunday in Los Angeles.

In addition to Tyler, Gingrich's campaign manager Rob Johnson, and senior strategists Dave Carney and Sam Dawson, vital in the early voting states, have also stepped down, Politico reported citing two sources close to the situation.

Carney, who was heading up Gingrich's efforts in New Hampshire, and is a former aide to Texas Gov. Rick Perry, who may be courting the idea of White House run himself, said: The professional team came to the realization that the direction of the campaign they sought and Newt's vision for the campaign was incompatible.

According to one official, Gingrich was intent on using technology and standing out at debates to get traction while he advisers believed a campaign that incorporated traditional and grassroots techniques was the best way to go.

Another official said Gingrich vacationing with his wife on a long-planned cruised in the Greek isles was the last straw.

Now, many are speculating that it is just a matter of time before Gingrich's campaign begins to crumble. Indeed, sources told CBS News that Gingrich's campaign has been long collapsing, saying there has been no clear direction and no clear plan to the nomination had been sketched out.

Sources told The Associated Press that Gingrich was informed that his entire high command was quitting in a meeting at his campaign headquarters in Washington.

Gingrich's campaign notoriously got off to a bad start when he said that Rep. Paul Ryan's plan to transform Medicare was a form of right-wing social engineering. He would late try to backtrack on the comment. And he was also stung by the allegation that he owed up to $500,000 to Tiffany jewelry company.