'The Great Gatsby': The 5 Adaptations Of The 20th And 21st Century [VIDEO]

  @lukeydukeyl.villapaz@ibtimes.com on May 07 2013 2:01 PM

With the fifth remake of "The Great Gatsby" premiering Friday, we're taking a look back at all the film adaptations of the iconic F. Scott Fitzgerald novel over the last 80 years. As time progressed, the films reflected different style choices and direction. Take a look at how “The Great Gatsby" has changed through each of its five iterations.

1926

This silent film adaptation was directed by Herbert Brenon and starred Warner Baxter, Lois Wilson and Neil Hamilton. Not much is known about this version aside from being “lighthearted”; no copies of this version are known to have survived. The only footage remaining of this version was the trailer, which has been preserved by the Library of Congress.

1949

This noir version was directed by Elliot Nugent and starred Alan Ladd, Betty Field and Macdonald Carey.

1974

This adaptation was directed by Jack Clayton, with the screenplay written by Francis Ford Coppola, starring Robert Redford, Mia Farrow and Bruce Dern. While praised for being true to the novel, it was critiqued for being emotionless in its depiction of the Jazz Age. Despite being panned, it was a commercial success, grossing $26.53 million on a $6.5 million budget.

2000

While the first few adaptations saw the big screen, this version was adapted for television. While not a big-screen performance, it starred some very notable actors, including Toby Stephens (“Die Another Day”), Mira Sorvino (“Mighty Aphrodite") and Paul Rudd (“Role Models”). While this version follows the book closely in some aspects, it's burdened by heavy use of narration and flashbacks.
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2013

As for the latest adaption, it is yet to be seen if this latest version lives up to the novel. Directed by Baz Luhrmann (“Moulin Rogue”) and starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Carey Mulligan, Joel Edgerton and Tobey Maguire, this flashy version of the 1925 novel may provide some glitz and glamour, but early reviews have the film sitting at 47 percent on Rotten Tomatoes.

Which adaptation do you think is the best? Do you think the 2013 version will live up to the novel? Let us know in the comments below.

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