(REUTERS) - A California-based hedge fund manager surrendered to FBI agents on insider-trading charges on Friday, the latest in a series of cases brought by the U.S. government in recent years against money managers and traders.

An FBI spokesman said an indictment would be unsealed later on Friday in federal court in New York outlining the charges against Doug Whitman, the founder of Whitman Capital in Menlo Park, California. The hedge fund's website describes it as a private partnership focused on the technology industry.

Whitman denies that he traded on the basis of unlawfully obtained inside information, his lawyer said in a statement. The lawyer, David Anderson of Sidley Austin LLP, said Whitman had cooperated with the government's investigation.

Mr Whitman did not pay any insiders or provide any personal benefit to any insiders for inside information, the statement said.

Anderson said the charges were based on information provided to investigators by two traders, Roomy Khan and Karl Motey, who have pleaded guilty to insider trading and conspiracy charges.

Their claims are false and will be proved false.

A spokeswoman for the office of the Manhattan U.S. Attorney declined comment because the indictment was not yet public.

Dozens of hedge fund managers, traders, consultants, lawyers and executives have been charged since 2009 in a sweep by federal authorities to stop money managers from gaining an illegal edge in the market with inside information.

Khan and Motey, both former technology industry traders, were among those charged who agreed to cooperate with the government in the hopes of reducing their prison sentences.

Khan was a one-time employee and friend of Galleon Group hedge fund founder Raj Rajaratnam, who was convicted by a jury last May on 14 criminal counts. Evidence provided by Khan about trades in Google Incand Polycom was part of the case against Rajaratnam, who is serving an 11-year prison term.

(Reporting By Grant McCool; Editing by Gerald E. McCormick and Matthew Lewis)