Ireland's government unveiled 2.2 billion euros (1.2 billion pounds) of spending cuts on Monday, the first half of what it is billing as the toughest budget of its five-year term.

Following are analysts' comments on the budget package:

EOIN O'MALLEY, POLITICS LECTURER AT DUBLIN CITY UNIVERSITY.

I don't think there will be riots on the streets of Dublin because of this. The government has prepared the public pretty well. Enda Kenny has somehow managed to transform himself. He is remarkably popular, very upbeat.

I don't think it will necessarily be a turning point for the worse. The government had a surprising extended honeymoon. In the last few weeks it's been rougher. Election promises are being presented as broken promises. It's a difficult time for the government, but not something it will fall on.

I'm not sure this government will be blamed for how tough things are. But it will be more and more difficult to blame the last government. Eventually this government will have to take responsibility for the decisions it is taking.

Obviously Labour's ratings are going to be hit and will continue to be hit. There will be some kind of nervousness. But Labour is mature enough to know that elections are four years away.

EOIN FAHY, CHIEF ECONOMIST, KLEINWORT BENSON INVESTORS:

Today's announcement is only regarding spending so in some ways tomorrow's announcement will be more significant. It certainly will pass, the government has an enormous majority and they have put in place measures to which the public reaction will not be extreme.

In terms of overall numbers it has been as we expected with no political dynamite and from a markets point of view a bit of a non-event.

The issue is how long (until) we get back to reasonably decent economic growth and I think it will be in three or four years after another two tough budgets. Obviously that depends on some sort of lasting resolution to the euro zone debt crisis.

MICHAEL CROWLEY, SENIOR ECONOMIST AT BANK OF IRELAND

In terms of spending adjustments, there has been no real surprise and these have been flagged. Whether the targets will be achieved will depend on how our exports perform and given that the global economy will expand only slightly, exports will grow, albeit slowly. Clearly there are a few more years of austerity left with the fiscal deficit needed to be brought down to 2 percent by 2015.

ALAN MCQUAID, CHIEF ECONOMIST, BLOXHAM STOCKBROKERS

They are going for the usual suspects, pushing off difficult decisions to a certain degree and hoping the economy picks up and they won't have to do as much.

If you are going to be cutting child benefit, cutting gross public pay, it's going to impact consumer spending.

Most people are revising growth forecasts downwards so it will be difficult for the government to hit its deficit targets. But if the euro zone crisis is sorted out we may get there. For the moment it's just a matter of wait and see.

You have to assume austerity will last longer (than the current four-year plan) given the state of world economy. All we can do is implement the measures we have and wait. We don't have much choice.

(Reporting by Dublin and London newsrooms; editing by Stephen Nisbet)