Libya's National Transitional Council (NTC) named a new government Tuesday.

Following are reactions:

A DIPLOMAT

Until the prime minister made his announcement, every diplomat in Tripoli was expecting (deputy envoy to the United Nations Ibrahim) Dabbashi as foreign minister. It's a big surprise.

We don't know him (new foreign minister Ashour Bin Hayal) at all. We are trying to find out where he is.

ANOTHER DIPLOMAT

What's really astonishing is the absence of (finance and oil minister in the outgoing government Ali) Tarhouni.

The diplomat said he felt that meant there could be questions over the expertise of the government but, he said: You can't be sure that these aren't good people. But it was a total surprise.

A THIRD DIPLOMAT

This is a transitional government that will be limited in time but can achieve some very important things for the country such as disarming militias, intervening in humanitarian emergencies, rebuilding infrastructures.

He said there seemed to be good representation geographically.

Zintan and Misrata, two important cities both got two important posts - defence and interior, these are fundamental ministries for the new government. They can help with disarming militias.

FOURTH DIPLOMAT

On the foreign minister, a fourth diplomat said it was a surprise as Dabbashi's name had been so widely cited as frontrunner.

When you have to form a government which will have to represent various geographical areas, inevitably new names will come up.

SPOKESMAN FOR EU FOREIGN POLICY CHIEF CATHERINE ASHTON

We very much look forward to working with Prime Minister El-Keib, his team and the international community on the major challenges that Libya faces.

The EU has been and will be steadfast in its support for Libya and its people and is confident that the interim leadership now in place will enable the country to embark on the political transition ahead.

BRITISH FOREIGN SECRETARY WILLIAM HAGUE

The formation of a transitional government, within the 30-day timeframe set out in the NTC's plans, is an important moment for Libya. Just three days after the arrest of Saif al-Islam Gaddafi, it shows that Libya is moving towards being an open, democratic state based on the rule of law.

I look forward to working with the transitional government as it addresses a number of challenges including stabilising the country, ensuring law and order, restarting the economy, preparing for elections and building a state based on human rights. The UK will be a strong partner for Libya in this work. This represents a real opportunity to achieve justice for some of the wrongs committed by the Gaddafi regime, for Britain as well as the people of Libya.

NATO OFFICIAL

NATO respects the fact that it is up to Libyans to shape their destiny and their government.

(Reporting by David Brunnstrom and Justyna Pawlak in Brussels, Mohammed Abbas in London, Marie-Louise Gumuchian in Tripoli and Alastair Macdonald in Cairo)