Lady Gaga is known for her outrageous style and fashion, but the Born This Way singer wants people to rethink how they look at an important topic - bullying.

We do not make a distinction between the bully and the victim. Each person is an equally important and valuable member of society, Gaga said to Time. What the foundation is about is a transformative change that is going to take a long time to affect the overall culture. Bullies were born this way, too.

Yesterday Lady Gaga launched the Born This Way Foundation with her mother Cynthia Germanotta, who will serve as president, at Harvard University. They were joined by some famous friends including Oprah, Deepak Chopra and Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius. Lady Gaga has already made a $1.2 million donation to the foundation.

In addition to monetary support, Gaga is doing her research on how the tables can be turned in bullying situations.

I'm doing everything that I can, working with experts, really studying the statistics to figure out a way we can make it cool or normal to be kind and loving, Gaga said.

Lady Gaga, who says she was bullied in school, explains that it could take one simple gesture by a person to stop the bullying cycle.

She could go up to one person in class who maybe is not one of the cool kids and say, 'I really like your T-shirt,' Gaga said when asked for advice for what an 11-year-old girl could do. That would be her one great loving and accepting deed for the day.

Lady Gaga is not the first celebrity to create a foundation or speak out against bullying.

Celebrities such as Anne Hathaway and Jenny McCarthy have recorded PSA's for the Trevor Project, which aims to combat suicide in LGBTQ youth.

Dan Savage, a well-known columnist and author, launched the It Gets Better campaign and has worked with many celebrities and now has a show on MTV.

CNN's Anderson Cooper has hosted several shows about bullying and so has Oprah.