The Thomas Fire raged on in California’s Ventura County Thursday as thousands of firefighters worked to put out the flames. The Thomas Fire had spread to some 108,000 acres by Thursday morning and was only five percent contained, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

More than 2,500 fire personnel were on scene to combat the flames using 471 fire engines and 12 helicopters, Cal Fire said. It was moving at “extreme rates of spread” and being pushed by strong winds of up to 66 mph in the area.

More than 88,000 people were evacuated as a result of the Thomas Fire, according to Cal Fire. Seventy-three homes and three commercial buildings were destroyed at last count. Fourteen additional homes were damaged, while another 15,000 remained threatened.

“It’s definitely moving,” Ventura County Sheriff’s Capt. Garo Kuredjian said Thursday, according to the Los Angeles Times. “Forecasters were correct in terms of the wind forecast for tonight – it’s much windier than it was yesterday.”

It remained unclear how many injuries or deaths there were as a result of the Thomas Fire, though authorities said a body was found within the burn area outside Santa Paula, according to CBS Los Angeles. The body had yet not been identified.

In addition to the Thomas Fire, the Creek Fire continued to rage in Sylmar at 10 percent containment, burning through more than 12,000 acres and destroying some 30 structures. Almost 100,000 residents were evacuated already. Near Bel Air, the Skirball Fire burned through about 475 acres and shut down both lanes of the populous 405 Freeway. The Skirball Fire was about five percent contained by Thursday morning.

Strong Santa Ana winds were expected to continue throughout the day, reaching up to 80 mph and hindering fire relief efforts throughout the Southern portion of the state, officials said. Red flag warnings were extended through Saturday, ABC News reported. Authorities predicted conditions would continue to be difficult in the coming days as fires forged onward with remarkable speed.

“There will be no ability to fight fire in these kinds of winds,” said California Fire Chief Ken Pimlott, according to the LA Times. “At the end of the day, we need everyone in the public to listen and pay attention. This is not ‘watch the news and go about your day.’ This is pay attention minute-by-minute…keep your head on a swivel.”

Thomas Fire 1 A civilian wearing a headlamp monitors a section of the Thomas Fire as it burns down a bluff as he tries to defend homes from the flames, Dec. 7, 2017 in La Conchita, California. Photo: Getty Images

Thomas Fire 2 Firefighters monitor a section of the Thomas Fire along the 101 freeway, Dec. 7, 2017, north of Ventura, California. Photo: Getty Images

Thomas Fire 3 Firefighters monitor a section of the Thomas Fire along the 101 freeway Dec. 7, 2017 north of Ventura, California. Photo: Getty Images

Thomas Fire 4 Firefighters work to extinguish the Thomas Fire as it burns past the 101 Highway towards the Pacific Coast Highway in Ventura, California, Dec. 7, 2017. Photo: Getty Images

GettyImages-887696532 Thomas Fire burns a hillside in Ojai, California, Dec. 7, 2017. Photo: Getty Images

Thomas Fire 5 Firefighter work to extinguish the Thomas Fire as it burns past the 101 Highway towards the Pacific Coast Highway in Ventura, California, Dec. 7, 2017. Photo: Getty Images