The week of Dec. 9 proved problematic on the red carpet after three starlets were victims of wardrobe malfunctions. First, Anne Hathaway pulled a Britney and was seen getting out of car on her way for a "Les Miserables" red carpet without underwear. Now, "Twilight's" Elizabeth Reaser and LeAnn Rimes are the latest victims.

Rimes, 30, suffered a nip slip at Wednesday night's NOH8 fourth anniversary party at Avalon in Hollywood. Having clearly forgot her double-sided tape at home, Rimes was seen with husband Eddie Cibrian with an exposed breast from her plunging neckline blazer in a photo taken by Splash News at the event. The country starlet performed at the event to promote marriage, gender and human equality.

But even worse -- almost as bad as Hathaway's incident -- was "Twilight" star Elizabeth Reaser during a press event for "Breaking Dawn Part 2" in Hong Kong. The 37-year-old actress, who plays Esme Cullen in the franchise, wore a short lace mini dress which became even shorter when she sat down for a Q&A session, E! News reported along with the photo. Reaser is seen in some photos answering questions with her underwear exposed. Well, at least she learned from Hathaway's blunder, and immediately took to Twitter.

"Nothing against going commando but I was wearing underwear you silly pervs xx," Reaser tweeted.

Meanwhile, Hathaway is still in hot water for her upskirt incident which she said "devastated" her. The brunette reportedly found out about her fashion oops the day after the paparazzi snapped and publicized the photo of her climbing out of a car without skivvies underneath her Tom Ford gown.

“I was getting out of the car and my dress was so tight that I didn’t realize it until I saw all the photographers’ flashes,” Hathaway told Vanity Fair writer Ingrid Sischy on Tuesday morning.

“It was devastating,” she said. “They saw everything. I might as well have lifted up my skirt for them.”

When Matt Lauer of the "Today" show asked her about the incident, Hathaway said it made her "sad."

"It was obviously an unfortunate incident," Hathaway said. "It kind of made me sad on two accounts. One was that I was very sad that we live in an age when someone takes a picture of another person in a vulnerable moment, and rather than delete it, and do the decent thing, sells it. And I'm sorry that we live in a culture that commodifies the sexuality of unwilling participants. Which brings us back to Les Mis[...] So lets get back to Les Mis."