Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., was quick to clarify Thursday night that he did not support rape and incest exemptions in abortion bans after GOP debate host Megyn Kelly asked about his stance on the issue. He laid out his explicit opposition, noting that "future generations will look back and call us barbarians for murdering millions of babies." But Kelly wasn't totally wrong -- Rubio's history with abortion is complicated.

This past July, he criticized Roe v. Wade, the landmark Supreme Court ruling that protected women's rights to abortion. "Our government – ever since a historically, egregiously flawed Supreme Court decision – has condoned the taking of innocent life on a massive scale," Rubio said. "The White House needs an occupant who values and prioritizes life."

In 2013, he cosponsored the Senate's Pain-Capabale Unborn Child Protection Act, which would prohibit people from performing abortions except in certain situations. These included scenarios where it was "necessary to save the life of a pregnant woman whose life is endangered by a physical disorder, illness, or injury, excluding psychological or emotional conditions" or "where the pregnancy is the result of rape, or the result of incest against a minor" if they've been reported. Rubio has also signed on in support of the current version of the bill, which passed in the House and is pending in the Senate.

Prior to that, Rubio voted for the 2001 Scarlet Letter state law that required single moms to list details about their sexual histories in local newspapers before their babies could be adopted, the Huffington Post reported. Then-Florida Gov. Jeb Bush did not veto the legislation.

Rubio's abortion comments came during the first GOP primary debate, sponsored by Fox News and held Thursday night at Cleveland's Quicken Loans Arena. Rick Perry, Bobby Jindal, Rick Santorum, Carly Fiorina, Lindsey Graham, George Pataki and Jim Gilmore faced off at 5 p.m., but the top 10 candidates were appeared during prime time. The lineup for the 9 p.m. debate included Donald Trump, Bush, Scott Walker, Ben Carson, Mike Huckabee, Rubio, Rand Paul, Ted Cruz, Chris Christie and John Kasich.

The election isn't for another year, but Thursday was considered the kickoff of debate season. Other GOP debates were set for Sept. 16, Oct. 28, Dec. 15, Feb. 6, Feb. 13 and Feb. 26, USA Today reported. Events will also take place in November, January and March, though specific dates have not yet been confirmed. Democrat debates were scheduled for Oct. 13, Nov. 14, Dec. 19, Jan. 17, and on unspecified dates in February and March.