Pitchers and catchers reported to spring training on Monday. For Mariano Rivera, this could be the last time.

The veteran reliever met the media and said he knows if this year will be his last.

He just won't tell anyone else.

I know now. I just don't want to tell you, said Rivera. I know now. I will let you guys know when I think I should tell you.

Although Rivera says he's made a decision on his future, he hasn't given a timetable for when he will let the public know.

Rivera is entering his 18th season with the Yankees and remains one of the top closers in the game.

He hasn't recorded less than 28 saves in a season since he became New York's closer in 1997. Rivera has been one of the league's best relievers his entire career, and says he wants to retire when he's still able to perform at a high level.

It is important for me to leave the game on top if God allows me to do that, just finish on top, knowing I did what I was called to do.

The reliever's personal life has also influenced his decision.

Rivera expressed how hard it was to leave his family to go to yet another spring training. The veteran spends as much time with his family during the season as possible. He sometimes takes a separate flight on road trips so he can spend an extra night at home.

However, Rivera said his ability to pitch well is what ultimately helped him make his final decision.

I won't be there dragging my arm to pitch. I'm not going to start pitching with my left arm. I want to be able to compete.

New York signed Rivera to a two-year, $30 million dollar contract prior to the 2011 season.

Whenever he decides to call it quits, the Yankees will dearly miss Rivera.

He's been New York's the most consistent closer in baseball since he entered the league. Rivera has a career 2.21 earned run average and is the all-time saves leader with 603.

Even at 41 years old, Rivera had a 1.91 ERA and finished eighth in voting for the American League Cy Young Award last season.