Mass Extinction by 2050: Ocean and Marine Life in Danger [PHOTOS]

 @ibtimes
on June 21 2011 5:05 PM
  • Mass extinction by 2050:  Ocean and marine life in danger (Photos)
    A diver explores dead coral reefs in Gili Trawangan at Indonesia's Lombok island May 13, 2009. Southeast Asia's biologically diverse coral reefs will disappear by the end of this century, wiping out coastal economies and sparking civil unrest if climate change is not addressed, Reuters
  • Mass extinction by 2050:  Ocean and marine life in danger (Photos)
    A fisherman uses a bamboo pole to push dead fish into a cage after a massive fish kill on Taal Lake, in Talisay, Batangas, south of Manila May 29, 2011. About 500 metric tons (500,000 kilos) of fish, worth more than 50 million pesos, were seen floating in the waters of six towns surrounding Taal Lake over the past two days, a local mayor said. A local town agriculturist said the cause of the fish kill was a sudden climate change in the area. Reuters
  • Mass extinction by 2050:  Ocean and marine life in danger (Photos)
    A volunteer collects waste material floating on the water during a coastal clean-up drive in Manila Bay September 19, 2010. Dozens of volunteers joined the International Coastal Clean-up drive to remove debris and rubbish from shorelines, waterways and oceans for a cleaner marine environment. Reuters
  • Mass extinction by 2050:  Ocean and marine life in danger (Photos)
    A dead fish lies over the dry Guadiaro river in Spain's southern town of San Roque August 9, 2005. More than 5,000 fish have died near the luxury housing state of Sotogrande as a result of the drought in the country and the extraction of subterranean running waters to take care of golf courses, local environmental groups said. Reuters
  • Mass extinction by 2050:  Ocean and marine life in danger (Photos)
    A decomposed fish lies in the water as workers pick up oil balls from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in Waveland, Mississippi in this July 7, 2010 file photo. April 20, 2011 is the first anniversary of the Deepwater Horizon rig explosion at BP's Macondo undersea well in the Gulf of Mexico. The accident killed 11 workers and triggered the United States' worst offshore oil spill, which was also the biggest ever accidental release of oil into an ocean. Reuters
  • Mass extinction by 2050:  Ocean and marine life in danger (Photos)
    A pelican coated in oil stands on the beach during stormy weather in Ship Island, Mississippi July 1, 2010. More than 10 weeks into the crisis, oil continued spewing into the Gulf, clean-up success remained limited and a proposal by the Obama administration to halt all deep-water drilling for the next six months remained in limbo. Reuters
  • Mass extinction by 2050:  Ocean and marine life in danger (Photos)
    A worker scoops oil from the oil spill site near Dalian Port, Liaoning province July 26, 2010. Dalian Port has resumed operations at two of its oil berths and its main 300,000 tonnage berth is expected to reopen soon, the company said on Sunday, after a fire at the port a week ago shut the berths down. Reuters
  • Mass extinction by 2050:  Ocean and marine life in danger (Photos)
    Crews conduct overflights of controlled burns taking place in the Gulf of Mexico, in this photograph taken on May 19, 2010 and released on May 20. During controlled burns, oil from the Deepwater Horizon incident is burned in an effort to reduce the amount of oil in the water. Reuters
  • Mass extinction by 2050:  Ocean and marine life in danger (Photos)
    A view shows crude oil in the sea near Dalian, Liaoning province July 18, 2010. An explosion hit an oil pipeline measuring 0.9 metres (2.9 feet) in diameter on Friday, triggering another explosion at an adjacent smaller pipeline near Dalian's Xingang Harbor, Xinhua News Agency reported. Reuters
  • Mass extinction by 2050:  Ocean and marine life in danger (Photos)
    A resident walks on the shore near the oil spill site at Dalian port, Liaoning province July 23, 2010. China's Xingang oil port has resumed some refined fuel loading for the domestic market, but fuel exports remain temporarily halted, industry officials said amid continuing efforts to clean up an oil spill at the country's major port of Dalian Reuters
  • Mass extinction by 2050:  Ocean and marine life in danger (Photos)
    A man uses a stick to measure the number of dead fish on top of each other after a massive fish kill at Taal Lake, in Talisay, Batangas, south of Manila May 29, 2011. About 500 metric tons (500,000 kilos) of fish, worth more than 50 million pesos, were seen floating in the waters of six towns surrounding Taal Lake over the past two days, a local mayor said. A local town agriculturist said the cause of the fish kill was a sudden climate change in the area Reuters
  • Mass extinction by 2050:  Ocean and marine life in danger (Photos)
    A fisherman pulls in a boat along a polluted coastline in Manila April 9, 2008. The 4th global conference on oceans, coasts and islands which began on Tuesday is a forum for developing and poor countries, many of which would be worst affected by climate change and nations will discuss how to preserve fisheries, protect coastlines and limit pollution. Reuters
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The current rate of climate change, pollution, and overfishing can result in an expedited consequence for mankind and the world oceans.  According to a report by international scientists, the study results have concluded that the world's ocean and marine life are dangerously degrading at an astronomical rate.  If the pace maintains, the world can expect to see the end of marine life by 2050, within our lifetime. 

One of the leading research director of the International Programme on the State of the Ocean from Oxford University, Alex Rogers spoke about the results from their research.

The results are shocking...We are looking at consequences for humankind that will impact in our lifetime... [Marine] degradation is now happening at a faster rate than predicted.. (it's a) serious situation demanding unequivocal action at every level, said Rogers.

The publication will try to spark talks about governing reforms on the oceans for future preservation.  The significant growth of the coral reef's destruction threatens marine life along with the research group's call to reduce contaminating oceans with chemicals, limit over fishing, and creating more protective habitats for marine life recovery. 

Issues with increase carbon emission and use of fertilizers have been significant in damaging the oceans where fish and marine life have suffered.  A fifth of the world's population depends on fish as a source of protein and the over fishing activities, due to high demand, along with unsustainable fisheries are wiping out the number of marine life.

The IPSO's presentation will be in New York later this week as the United Nations will review the results and dangerous warnings in order to discuss future plans for the survival of our world's oceans. 

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