More men die from cancer than women, according to a study published Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

The study found               times as many men died from                    cancer than women.

                             5.51                                                                        lip

                             5.37                                                                        larnyx

                             4.47                                                                        throat

                             4.08                                                                        esophagus

                             3.36                                                                        bladder  

                             2.31                                                                        lung

                             2.23                                                                        liver

Of the 36 cancers studied, only peritoneum, gall bladder, and anus cancer had higher mortality rates for women.

In fact, US men have a 1 in 2 chance of developing cancer in their lifetime compared to only 1 in 3 chance for US women, according to the American Cancer Society.

Scientists can't exactly explain this discrepancy, but it's not likely all due to the genetic differences between the male and female gender.  Instead, lifestyle and life choices likely play a role.

Some possible environmental factors include more exposure to carcinogenic materials like tobacco, alcohol, and toxic metals.

Another factor could be the utilization of health care.  Men generally visit doctors less often and get fewer cancer screenings.  However, this may run counter to the study's findings because it was the prevalence of cancer in men, not the survivability of male cancer patients, that was responsible for the gender cancer discrepancy.

The take-home point from this article is: Guys, don't blow off symptoms or screenings, and adopt healthy lifestyles, said Mikkael Sekeres, MD, a cancer epidemiologist, to Health.com.