Six new dog breeds became eligible to compete in the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show, America's oldest competition dedicated to purebred dogs.

The new breeds have exotic names and include the Entlebucher (ent-lee-BOO'-kehr) mountain dog, the Norwegian Lundehund (LUHN'-dee-hund), the American English coonhound, the Finnish Lapphund (LAP'-hundh), the Cesky (CHESS'-key) terrier and the Xoloitzcuintli (show-low-itz-QUINT'-lee), previously called the Mexican Hairless, according to The Associated Press.

The dogs will compete with 179 other Westminster-approved breeds Feb. 13-14 at Madison Square Garden in New York City.

The 185 dog breeds currently approved constitute a 30 percent increase from 1990, when 142 breeds were eligible. That number dwarves the approximately 1,400 breeds, according to the Dog Breed Info Center. Not all of the breeds included in the list are purebreds.

http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/abc.htm

The American Kennel Club approves new eligible breeds through several criteria: a significant number of dogs need to be in the United States and a club specific to that breed must exist.

However, it is unlikely that the new breeds will take home the coveted best in show in 2012. The most recent new breed - the Bichon Frise - won the title in 2001, 27 years after its introduction in 1974.

Below are five breeds that won't be seen at the 2012 dog show:

Bergamasco - This breed sports dreadlocked-like fur and is an ancient breed from nearly 2,000 years ago.

Llewellin Setter - Friendly and active, this breed fares best outdoors and can be trained to be watchdogs.

Mucuchies - This pack breed is the national dog breed of Venezuela and is known to be very active.

Saarlooswolfhond - This dog retains wolf-like qualities including a forceful pack instinct and are best suited for outdoor cold climates.

Wetterhoun - This breed has a thick, coarse and oily coat and is bred to be a working water dog in its native Holland.