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Just about nine out of 10 adults (88 percent) in the U.S. owns a cellphone and according to a new research from the Pew Internet and American Life Project, a vast majority of them report experiencing problems like dropped calls and slow data with their devices.

According to the survey, 72 percent of cell owners experienced dropped calls at least occasionally. Some 32 percent of cell owners among them said they encountered this problem at least a few times a week or more frequently than that.

Another complaint was about unwanted sales and marketing calls, which was reported by 68 percent of cellphone users. And among them, 25 percent said they encountered this problem at least a few times a week or more frequently.

Some 79 percent of cell hone owners said that they used text messaging on their cells and Pew found 69 percent of them complaining about unwanted spam or text messages.

About 77 percent of those people who used their phones to go online said they experienced slow download speeds that prevented things from loading as quickly as they would like.

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Source: Pew Internet

Pew said that smartphone owners reported higher incidence levels of these problems, compared with other cellphone owners. For example, 35 percent of smartphone owners experienced dropped calls at least weekly, compared with 28 percent of cellphone owners.

When it comes to unwanted sales and marketing calls, 26 percent of smartphone owners complained about the issue, compared to 23 percent of feature phone users.

While 29 percent of smartphone owners said they received spam texts at least weekly, compared with 21 percent of feature phone users, almost half of smartphone users (50 percent) said they experienced slow download speeds, compared with 31 percent of other cellphone users.

As CNN noted, although the Pew report didn't look at the incidence of poor audio quality with voice calls, "any cell phone user who grew up in the age of landlines can tell you that the sound quality of calls to and from cell phones is far worse than landline call quality."

"As mobile owners become fond of just-in-time access to others and as their expectations about getting real-time information rise, they depend on the cell phone's technical reliability," said Pew researcher Jan Lauren Boyles.

"Any problems that snag, stall, or stop users from connecting to the material and people they seek is at least a hassle to them and sometimes is even more disturbing than that in this networked world," he added.