Porsche’s 2017 911 sports car will have a number of new features, but Android Auto won't be one of them.

That’s because automakers that sign up to install Google’s car infotainment system are required to collect and send back certain data to the company -- such as a vehicle’s speed, RPMs and coolant temperatures, according to Motor Trend. That’s information that Porsche isn’t keen on sharing. In comparison, Apple CarPlay only checks to see whether a vehicle is in motion.

One possible reason for Porsche not wanting its car data to be shared is Google’s efforts to develop a self-driving car. On the other hand, Apple has hired a number of vehicle experts to help develop its own electric car, which is targeted to ship in 2019, according to the Wall Street Journal. Though driverless-car experts were among its hires, Apple isn’t expected to make its vehicle completely autonomous.

While Porsche’s cars won’t come with Google’s infotainment system, its sibling brand Volkswagen has pledged support for both technologies.

Apple first teased its “iOS in the car” project in 2013 during its Worldwide Developers Conference and formally unveiled it to the public in March 2014, under the name CarPlay. Vehicles with the system installed are able to display the CarPlay interface with a touch screen on the dashboard whenever an iPhone is connected. From there, drivers can get directions, make phone calls, play music and send or receive text messages via Siri -- all without picking up the phone.

Android Auto is a similar technology for Google smartphones running Android Lollipop or higher. It provides many of the same features. But it also has a few tricks up its sleeve, such as Google Now’s live information stream and support for third-party messaging apps.