President Barack Obama and Russian President Dmitri Medvedev released a joint statement Wednesday after their meeting in London in which they promised a fresh start in relations between our two countries.

Relations between the two nations have been strained in recent months, especially after the US strongly opposed Russia's recent military actions in Georgia.

We, the leaders of Russia and the United States, are ready to move beyond Cold War mentalities, the statement said.

In just a few months we have worked hard to establish a new tone in our relations. Now it is time to get down to business and translate our warm words into actual achievements of benefit to Russia, the United States, and all those around the world interested in peace and prosperity.

The statement said the two leaders discussed measures to overcome the effects of the global economic crisis, strengthen the international monetary and financial system, restore economic growth, and advance regulatory efforts to ensure that such a crisis does not happen again.

It also stated the leaders discussed nuclear arms control and reduction. As leaders of the two largest nuclear weapons states, we agreed to work together to fulfill our obligations under Article VI of the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and demonstrate leadership in reducing the number of nuclear weapons in the world.

We intend, the statement continued, to carry out joint efforts to strengthen the international regime for nonproliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their means of delivery.

In this regard we strongly support the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, and are committed to its further strengthening. Together, we seek to secure nuclear weapons and materials, while promoting the safe use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes.

On the subject of terrorism, the statement said Obama and Medvedev agreed that al-Qaida and other terrorist and insurgent groups operating in Afghanistan and Pakistan pose a common threat to many nations, including the United States and Russia.

We agreed to work toward and support a coordinated international response with the UN playing a key role.

We also started a dialogue on security and stability in Europe, the statement added.

Although we disagree about the causes and sequence of the military actions of last August, we agreed that we must continue efforts toward a peaceful and lasting solution to the unstable situation today.

In closing their statement, Obama and Medvedev said they were ready to chart a fresh start in relations between the US and Russia.

In just a few months we have worked hard to establish a new tone in our relations. Now it is time to get down to business and translate our warm words into actual achievements of benefit to Russia, the United States, and all those around the world interested in peace and prosperity.

White House officials said on Wednesday that Obama will visit Moscow in July.

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