Robert Downey Jr., who is well-known for his portrayal of Iron Man in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, might be considering a TV project with HBO since the network is looking into a “Perry Mason” reboot.

Downey is planning to work with “True Detective” creator Nic Pizzolatto, according to Variety. There have been no extra details provided about the upcoming project, except for the fact that the reboot will be a series instead of a feature film.

Team Downey, comprised of Pizzolatto, Joe Horacek, Downey Jr. and his producing partner and wife Susan Downey, will serve as executive producers.

“Perry Mason” will be Downey’s first starring role on television. He previously appeared in “Ally McBeal” during the early 2000s before making it big in film.

When asked for a comment, both Pizzolatto and Downey refused to provide any.

“Perry Mason” is a courtroom drama series, according to Collider. The title character is a defense attorney who privately investigates crimes for his clients.

The character was created by Erle Stanley Gardner. It was adapted by CBS as a television series from 1957 to 1966 starring Raymond Burr. It was later picked up as another television series titled “The New Perry Mason,” which starred Monte Markham and ran from 1973 to 1974. Over 30 "Perry Mason" television films aired between 1985 and 1995.

Meanwhile, Downey’s fans are desperately hoping to see him do another “Iron Man” standalone film. But for now, he is only slated to appear in “Spider-Man: Homecoming,” which stars Tom Holland as the new web-slinger, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

Downey’s Tony Stark and Holland’s Peter Parker first met in “Avengers: Age of Ultron,” and they formed an easy alliance because of their shared love of science. In Holland’s standalone film, Downey and Parker will continue that budding friendship.

“Spider-Man: Homecoming” will be released on July 7, 2017. Robert Downey Jr. Robert Downey Jr. is planning to work with HBO for a "Perry Mason" reboot. The actor is pictured here at the UK premiere of “Captain America: Civil War” in London on April 26, 2016. Photo: Getty Images/Ian Gavan