Legendary film critic Roger Ebert slammed Jackass star Ryan Dunn for his drunken driving that may have caused his tragic death and tweeted Friends don't let Jackasses drink and drive.

Ebert refused to apologize and defended his remarks by responding insensitively to blogger Perez Hilton by saying Perez Hilton's readers agree with me and not with Perez about my tweet on Ryan Dunn. He drank, he drove, 2 people died.

Perez Hilton was suggesting Ebert may have made his comments too soon.

The tweets caused an outrage and uproar among Dunn's friends, fans and well-wishers, leading to brief removal of his Facebook account.

Facebook has removed my page in response, apparently, to malicious complaints from one or two jerks, Ebert tweeted.

Ebert, who is the first film critic to win a Pulitzer Prize for Criticism, added, Facebook! My page is harmless and an asset to you. Why did you remove it in response to anonymous jerks? Makes you look bad.

However, Ebert's Facebook page is currently up and running.

But, several Netizens blasted Ebert for his arrogance.

A tweet from xRay Burns says: Are you so desperate that you resort to DANCING ON SOMEONE'S GRAVE? For some easy meaningless rhetoric? Ur arrogance=disgrace.

Another tweet from Jimmy Patrick said: stick to movies a**hole. You aren't privy to Dunn's autopsy. Your not f****ing God!

Daredevil Ryan Dunn breathed his last early Monday after a fatal car crash in Pennsylvania. During the crash, Dunn's 2007 Porsche 911 GT3 went off a road, crashed in to woods and caught fire. According to police, the accident occurred at 3 a.m. on Route 322 and New Street in West Goshen Township.

TMZ reported that sources informed Dunn had drunk at least three light beers and three shots between 10.30 pm and 2.10 am at Barnaby's of America bar. Incidentally, Dunn celebrated his 34th birthday last June 11, weeks before his fatal accident last night.

Dunn was famous for his willingness to be harmed for the sake of entertainment and fun. He starred in three TV shows -Jackass, Viva la Bam, and Homewrecker, all of which showcased his penchant for peril.