Rarely does an anecdotal piece written for a digital news and lifestyle publication garner such a vociferous response that it becomes an international headline, but that is just what Samantha Brick's Daily Mail article managed to do.

Samantha Brick, a 41-year-old from the UK, wrote an article for the Daily Mail describing how her life is decidedly difficult because she is just too pretty.

Yes, you read that correctly.

The article took off like lightning, speeding across the Internet as more and more readers voiced their comments on the self-aggrandizing piece. Brick's first article garnered more than 132,000 Facebook likes and more than 5,000 comments; her second article took in 20,000 Facebook likes and more than 3,500 comments (as of this writing).

WHERE ON EARTH IS SHE LOOKING?! I want her mirror! asked one commentator.

She doesn't seem to grasp the fact that the vitriol doesn't stem from her so called beauty it stems from her delusion that she is ultra beautiful in fact so pretty that people can't bare it, the simple reason is that she isn't that though far from ugly she isn't that attractive, I do think she suffers fr p[sic] body dismorphia [sic] though, another added.

The top tweet about Samantha Brick's article reads: I've heard of beer-goggles. Samantha Brick would appear to possess a 'beer-mirror,' written by Twitter user boothby graffoe.

In her Daily Mail article, Brick detailed how, throughout her 41 years, she has faced harrowing difficulties all because she is just too beautiful for other women to handle. Adoring attention from men, fabulous clothes and supreme confidence have made her the target of many women's jealousies. Sarah Brick explained how all the presumably lowly women around her could never compete and, so, responded viciously in turn.

Here are some of the most outrageous quotes from Brick's original Daily Mail article:

Throughout my adult life, I've regularly had bottles of bubbly or wine sent to my restaurant table by men I don't know. Once, a well-dressed chap bought my train ticket when I was standing behind him in the queue, while there was another occasion when a charming gentleman paid my fare as I stepped out of a cab in Paris.

Another time, as I was walking through London's Portobello Road market, I was tapped on the shoulder and presented with a beautiful bunch of flowers. Even bar tenders frequently shoo my credit card away when I try to settle my bill.

I'm not smug and I'm no flirt, yet over the years I've been dropped by countless friends who felt threatened if I was merely in the presence of their other halves. If their partners dared to actually talk to me, a sudden chill would descend on the room.

And most poignantly of all, not one girlfriend has ever asked me to be her bridesmaid. You'd think we women would applaud each other for taking pride in our appearances.

I approached a mutual friend and discreetly enquired if I'd made a faux pas [towards a neighbor]. It seems the only crime I've committed is not leaving the house with a bag over my head.She doesn't like me, I discovered, because she views me as a threat. The friend pointed out she is shorter, heavier and older than me.

It was clear that when you have a female boss, it's best to let them shine, but when you have a male boss, it's a different game: I have written in the Mail on how I have flirted to get ahead at work, something I'm sure many women do.

Now I'm 41 and probably one of very few women entering her fifth decade welcoming the decline of my looks. I can't wait for the wrinkles and the grey hair that will help me blend into the background. Perhaps then the sisterhood will finally stop judging me so harshly on what I look like, and instead accept me for who I am.

Samantha Brick's shockingly boastful Daily Mail article, which included multiple photos of Brick posing in dresses and next to her French husband, was followed by another after criticism rained down on the gloating 41-year-old.

While I've been shocked and hurt by the global condemnation, I have just this to say: my detractors have simply proved my point. Their level of anger only underlines that no one in this world is more reviled than a pretty woman, Brick wrote in her follow-up piece.

Brick then proceeded to compare her situation to something Angelina Jolie would go through.  

If Brad Pitt were to say: 'Yes, I'm a good-looking fella,' then the world would nod sagely in agreement. But if Angelina Jolie uttered something along those lines, she'd be subject to the same foaming-at-the-mouth onslaught hurled at me yesterday, she said.

Many readers were appalled by the comparison.

The world would agree with Brad and Angelina because they actually ARE beautiful. This woman is NOT physically stunning and that is just a fact. Pooched out belly, thick stumpy legs, weak chin, high forehead.... I'm sorry but we commenters [sic] out here are not being cruel, we are simply not blind, wrote one commentator from the U.S.

But... you aren't pretty. At all. Or at least, not photogenic. I don't know what's wrong with you, but can you stop attention-seeking in a national newspaper now? People are losing their homes to a tornado in Texas and all you can do is complain about how your good looks (read: vapid personality) have ruined your life. I wouldn't be half as mad, but you actually, seriously, 100% are not good looking. Your delusion and self-centredness angers me. Get a life and some perspective, you sad, pathetic woman, wrote another commentator from London.

Samantha Brick took time to speak with the Huffington Post UK, describing her sheer shock over the response her articles have received.

Personally it's very surreal, I live in the middle of nowhere, Internet is erratic, no one here knows what Twitter is, she told the Huffington Post UK.

Although she said that she has troubled keeping female friends, she has many acquaintances of the opposite sex. I have lots of male friends. They don't bulls--- you or b---- behind your back and they'll always tell you if you look good (without necessarily trying to get into your underwear).

Samantha Brick added that she used to be an ugly duckling.

After entering puberty the weight dropped, the spots were controlled and the hair was dyed blonde. When you've been the ugly duckling, you notice when the world deems you a swan.

What do you think of Samantha Brick's Daily Mail articles? Leave your feedback in the comments section below.