Scarlett Johansson has broken her silence for the first time regarding her nude photos that have been circulating the Internet for the past two weeks.

The actress told CNN that everyone was entitled to having their own privacy. Just because you're an actor or make films or whatever doesn't mean you're not entitled to your own personal privacy. If that is sieged in some way, it feels unjust. It feels wrong,' she said.

The Lost in Translation star explained that when one's personal privacy is violated it feels immoral. When asked by CNN why protecting privacy was important she said the question was redundant. Who doesn't want to protect their privacy? She asked

Two weeks ago, The FBI launched an investigation into an alleged hacking incident resulting in half-nude photos of the actress being leaked on the Web.

An FBI official told Fox News that they were aware of the alleged hacking incident and will be looking into it.

The photos are reported to have come from the artist's cell phone, some showing her back framed by a towel and others with her completely topless. The photos started trending ferociously on the Web with bloggers and social media outlets revealing the best places to find them.

Johansson is one of 50 celebrities who has fallen victim to hacking of cell phones and internet addresses, including Jessica Alba and Vanessa Hudgens.

FBI spokesperson, Laura Eimiller told E News that the FBI were investigating a person or group responsible for a series of cyber intrusions of high profile figures. This would include many devices-could mean a computer, desktop, laptop, iPad, cell phone...intrusions into personal online accounts too, she said

Following the incident, Johansson has been closely followed by the media. First spotted in New York partying with friend Justin Timberlake and a week later she was seen in Paris having, what seemed to be, a romantic brunch with Kieran Kulkan.

Now the actress is in Nairobi, Kenya working on an Oxfam famine campaign. The Oxfam ambassador told CNN that she wanted to highlight the depth of human suffering. She said she was touched by the harrowing stories of many of the people she met at refugee camps, including a woman who was forced to leave her handicapped child behind in her search for food.

The government provides no refuge for their citizens and that in any state is enraging and there is huge injustice, Johansson told CNN's David McKenzie.