Secret Service Hooker Scandal: Dismissed Agent To Sue Agency

on April 19 2012 12:04 PM

While three Secret Service agents have been forced out of the job as a result of the hooker scandal that rocked the country, one of the agents is already planning to sue to get his job back.

The controversy erupted after an internal investigation by the Secret Service revealed the specifics behind who was responsible for the soiree that occurred last week at the Hotel El Caribe.

It was there that as many as 20 Columbian hookers partied with Obama's security detail, just a day before his arrival in the Caribbean resort city for the Summit of the Americas, according to the New York Post.  

Eleven agents and 10 military personnel are accused of hiring prostitutes and engaging in other inappropriate behavior. Only three agents have received punishments.

While the three Secret Service agents have not been identified, one was a supervisor who was removed for cause; a second was a supervisor who was forced to retire and the third was a uniformed officer who chose to resign.

According to CBS News, it is the dismissed officer who plans to sue the agency, as Mark Sullivan, the agency's director, informed lawmakers Wednesday night.

The eight agents who have not received punishment are currently suspended, as the agency's office of Professional Responsibility investigates the happenings of April 11, at the Hotel El Caribe, according to the New York Post.

 In the meantime, the prostitute who is responsible for the scandal spoke publicly for the first time, saying the Secret Service agent propositioned her at a nightclub and promised her an $800 gift in exchange for sex.

The next morning, when hotel staffers called to have the 24-year-old hooker ousted from the hotel, the agent said he was drunk when they negotiated her price -- and offered her a measly 30 bucks as compensation.

I tell him, 'Baby, my cash money,' the unnamed hooker told The New York Times.

The disagreement quickly set off a verbal conflict in the hallway of the hotel, involving the woman, another hooker, Columbian police officers arguing in favor of the women and federal agents who tried to keep the matter from escalating.

Officials from the agency are actively looking further in to the situation, as it is an issue they want to get resolved as quickly as possible.

The Secret Service wants to get it behind them probably more than anybody else does at this point . . . This attention is negative, and it's not good, and is not reflective of the Secret Service and its people, Former Secret Service director Brian Stafford told CBS News.