Sharon Osbourne Double Mastectomy: 'The Talk' Co-Host Removes Breasts For Cancer Prevention

“The Talk” co-host Sharon Osbourne knows what it’s like to battle cancer after fighting pancreatic cancer 10 years ago. After recently learning she had a gene that makes it more susceptible for her to have breast cancer, Osbourne took pre-emptive action by undergoing a double mastectomy, 

Osbourne decided to remove both of her breasts to eradicate the chance that she may develop breast cancer in the future, the former “X Factor” judge told the U.K.’s Hello! magazine.

"As soon as I found out I had the breast cancer gene, I thought: 'The odds are not in my favor,’" Osbourne told the magazine. "I've had cancer before and I didn't want to live under that cloud: I decided to just take everything off, and had a double mastectomy." 

Osbourne successfully battled pancreatic cancer 10 years ago. Her struggles with the disease were documented in the successful MTV reality show, “The Osbournes,” which followed Sharon, rocker and husband Ozzy Osbourne and their children, Jack and Kelly.

 Sharon Osbourne was under the knife for 13 hours during her double mastectomy. She said she didn’t labor over her decision to undergo the operation.

"For me, it wasn't a big decision, it was a no-brainer. I didn't want to live the rest of my life with that shadow hanging over me. I want to be around for a long time and be a grandmother to Pearl,” she said, referring to the daughter of her son, Jack.

Sharon Osbourne said she isn’t fretting over the loss of her breasts.

“I didn't even think of my breasts in a nostalgic way, I just wanted to be able to live my life without that fear all the time,” she told Hello! "It's not 'pity me', it’s a decision I made that's got rid of this weight that I was carrying around."

Sharon’s decision to have the double mastectomy came as another Osbourne recently learned of a health issue.

Jack Osbourne, 26, revealed in June that he was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis.

He earlier told the British tabloid that he wasn’t going to let the disease affect his mood.

"While I was waiting for the final results, I got really, really angry," he said. "Then I got really sad for about two days, and after that I realized, being angry and upset is not going to do anything at this point -- if anything it's only going to make it worse."

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