Sherman Hemsley died more than a month ago, but the body of "The Jeffersons" star is yet to be buried due to a contentious battle over his will.

Hemsley, who found stardom after appearing as George Jefferson on "All In The Family," died July 24 at his home in El Paso, Tex. He was 74.

Hemsley's embalmed body is sitting in a refrigerator at an El Paso funeral home because of a fight over his will.

On one side is Hemsley's "beloved partner" Flora Enchinton, who is listed as the sole beneficiary of the actor's estate in the document signed by Hemsley six weeks before his death, the Associated Press reported. There is no specific number on Hemsley's assets, but the will specifies his estate's value at more than $50,000, according to the AP.

On the other side is Philadelphia resident Richard Thornton, who says he is Hemsley's brother and argues that the will may not have been drawn up by "The Jeffersons" star, the AP reported.

Enchinton, 56, said she's never heard Hemsley mention Thornton before. She told the wire service that she had been the actor's manager for more than two decades and lived with Hemsley and his friend, Kenny Johnston.

"Some people come out of the woodwork - they think Sherman, they think money," Enchinton told the AP. "But the fact it that I did not know Sherman when he was in the limelight. I met them when they (Hemsley and Johnston) came running from Los Angeles with not one penny, when there was nothing but struggle."

The AP could not reach the attorney representing Thornton in the battle over Hemsley's will.

Hemsley's role as George Jefferson was one of the landmark moments in television history. Jefferson owned a dry cleaning business on "All In The Family" and was the first major black character on a television sitcom. The character was so successful a spin-off show, "The Jeffersons," was created.