Some formidable figures in politics have come out against the decision by major Web sites like Wikipedia and Reddit to “black out” Wednesday to protest the Stop Online Piracy Act and Protect IP Act.

Christopher Dodd, the former Democratic senator from Connecticut who is now chairman of Motion Picture Association of America Inc., said in a statement: “Some technology business interests are resorting to stunts that punish their users or turn them into their corporate pawns, rather than coming to the table to find solutions to a problem that all now seem to agree is very real and damaging.”

Dodd added: “It is an irresponsible response and a disservice to people who rely on them for information and use their services. It is also an abuse of power given the freedoms these companies enjoy in the marketplace today. It’s a dangerous and troubling development when the platforms that serve as gateways to information intentionally skew the facts to incite their users in order to further their corporate interests.”

The MPAA chairman further blasted the blackouts as “yet another gimmick, albeit a dangerous one, designed to punish elected and administration officials who are working diligently to protect American jobs from foreign criminals. It is our hope that the White House and the Congress will call on those who intend to stage this 'blackout' to stop the hyperbole and PR stunts and engage in meaningful efforts to combat piracy.”

However, Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg has come out in opposition to the anti-piracy laws.

On his Facebook page (where else?), Zuckerberg said: “The internet is the most powerful tool we have for creating a more open and connected world. We can't let poorly thought out laws get in the way of the internet's development. Facebook opposes SOPA and PIPA, and we will continue to oppose any laws that will hurt the internet.”

He added: “The world today needs political leaders who are pro-internet. We have been working with many of these folks for months on better alternatives to these current proposals. I encourage you to learn more about these issues and tell your congressmen that you want them to be pro-internet.”

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