SOPA is gone for now (until someone reintroduces it), but ACTA and OPEN are two other anti-piracy measures written in the same spirit. ACTA isn't a proposed U.S. law, however. It's an international treaty already signed by several countries including the U.S.

OPEN, on the other hand, picks up right where SOPA took off. The Online Protection and Enforcement of Digital Trade Act has support from the likes of Google and Facebook, and the proposed bill includes protections for Web sites that take down pirated materials in a reasonable time. Furthermore, OPEN would prevent piracy Web sites from having access to payment services like PayPal. Enforcement of the bill would fall to the U.S. Trade Commission instead of the Justice Department, a move that may be intended specifically to ward off online criticism.

Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., who opposed SOPA, introduced the bill and even asked for people online to take part in drafting it. It's at keepthewebopen.com, although Issa would have the final say on what language would be included.

Meanwhile, the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement is already being fought by some foreign governments who are being pressured to ratify it. Members of the Polish Parliament even donned Guy Fawkes masks, Occupy style, in protest of the treaty. While both measures seek to stop online piracy (a good thing), they cold be legally interpreted in ways that would (like SOPA), alter the Internet landscape.

That's because they would have the authority to close down Web sites hosting pirated content. Under current U.S. law, Web sites are protected out of fear of widespread self-censorship. Web sites would begin censoring their own content in order to avoid getting sued, and that is why a Supreme Court ruling protects them. OPEN would have to pass through the House of Representatives and the Senate before it could become a law.

Tell us in the comments what you think is the best way to stop online piracy.