John Wall: DC’s Forgotten Star

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John Wall: DC’s Forgotten Star

While Robert Griffin III wins the city'e hearts, Stephen Strasburg reminds Nats fans why we never know what you got until it's gone and Bryce Harper tantalizes Major League Baskeball with his potential, it's easy to forget about someone when you don't see them often. This has been the case with the Washington Wizards, 6-foot-4 Guard, John Wall who has been injured and stuck on a losing team. As the first overall pick in the 2010 NBA draft out of Kentucky, Wall was supposed to be a superstar, assume greatness, and lead the Wizards into the playoffs. It hasn't happened in the past two years, and it doesn't look any different this year with Wall now out for about 8 weeks with a stress fracture in his knee.

Wall, a point guard as a freshman at Kentucky who came out early, still has to mature as an NBA player. As one of the quickest guards in the NBA especially through the lane in transition, he still has to be more of a consistent finisher, work on his jump shot and core, and improve on passing and avoiding turnovers. There is superstar talent but his results have only been good when considering his team and the amount he has played. Last year in all 66 games he averaged 36.2 min. and was 44th in the NBA in scoring. His career record averages are: .416% shooting with 16.3 points, 8.2 assists, 4.6 rebounds, and 3.8 turnovers.

The Wizards finished 2nd to last in the NBA last year in a locked out shortened season. Although the Wiz acquired Brazilian NeNe as the second go-to player behind Wall from the Denver Nuggets in March 2012 before the trade deadline, there were only flashes of brilliance by both.

The 2012-13 season does not look any better with Wall out to start with, a young team, only one listed point guard on the roster eight-year. vet Jannero Pargo, and 10-year. vet NeNe prone to foot issues (plantar fasciitis, etc.). The front court is okay, but the back court has some concerns even if Wall is healthy. Jordan Crawford looked for more shots than setting up Wall, and Rookie Bradley Beal might have the same problems once Wall comes back. Trying to lead a rebuilding team in a tough position has been and will continue to be difficult for Wall as such a young player.

The knee injury was an obvious setback for Wall and the Wizards as heard on Oct. 1st's Media Day. So much of the team and this upcoming season are contingent around Wall's ability to propel the team and make superstar status as the top pick. When you get drafted number one,” Wall said, “It’s on you to change the program around, change the organization around, be in the playoffs and contend for a championship. That’s something I want to do.” The good news is from his statement Wall has what it takes to be a superstar in the NBA, help the Wizards back to the play-offs, to be seen more on national TV, and not be forgotten.