The Oakland Raiders have boosted their anaemic pass rush, by signing veteran rush end Andre Carter, according to NFL.com.

This is a smart move by the new Raiders regime and one they had to make. Rookie head coach Dennis Allen's defense currently ranks 31st in sacks. The unit has a mere three quarterback takedowns to its credit.

Carter is sure to improve those numbers. The 33-year-old is still a skilled and savvy pass-rusher with excellent takeoff speed. He collected 10 sacks as a member of the New England Patriots in 2011 and two years earlier, recorded 11 sacks with the Washington Redskins.

The 11-year pro operates best in the kind of 4-3 scheme the Raiders run. He will certainly benefit from the presence of hulking defensive tackle duo Tommy Kelly and Richard Seymour.

Carter has been fortunate to play alongside some stellar defensive tackles during his career. He has worked with the likes of Bryant Young and the controversial, yet supremely talented Albert Haynesworth.

Seymour and Kelly can create the kind of one-on-one matchups on the edge that Carter thrives on. He still possesses a cat-quick first step and uses his hands extremely well.

Carter was enjoying one of the finest years of his career last season, before a quadriceps injury ended his campaign. His first action for the Raiders could be attempting to get to Peyton Manning, when the Silver and Black travel to Denver to take on the Broncos this Sunday.

That's an intriguing matchup to watch and could be the beginning of Carter regaining his best form. The Raiders have often been a haven for discarded veterans and Carter has the talent and is in the right scheme to make this move a success.

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