William J. Bratton could be the type of contender for president that gives candidates from both major parties a serious run for their money.

"Supercop" Bratton's record of fighting crime overshadows two other major accomplishments: negotiating his way through big-city bureaucracies as well as displaying leadership qualities that make him as sought-after in the business world as he is in law enforcement.

These two traits - effective corporate leader and bureaucracy-buster - make him an ideal presidential candidate in an age when the current front-runners - Obama included - appear to be big government insiders who are out of touch with the concerns of ordinary citizens.

Bratton's back in the news because he's been tapped by the British prime minister, David Cameron, to advise law enforcement and government officials in England on how to tackle growing urban violence there. The Guardian newspaper of London reported that Bratton, the former New York and Los Angeles police chief, will share his expertise in tackling gang violence and street crime, which includes making police forces more ethnically diverse.

Bratton said British police needed to focus on calming racial tensions by working more with community leaders and civil rights groups, noting that communities could not "arrest their way out" of gang crime, according to the Guardian.

Bratton has told British officials that they should instead tackle the underlying causes of unrest, such as racial tensions. Employing more police officers from ethnic minority communities was another potential long-term solution to stopping future disorder, Bratton said.

The "supercop" is already a president of sorts. He's chairman of Kroll, the global security firm, and previously served as chairman of Altegrity Risk International. Both firms are known for offering investigative, intelligence, financial, due diligence, security and technology services to clients.

Plus, Bratton is the only man ever to lead both the New York Police Department and the Los Angeles Police Department, two of the largest police forces in America. In both departments he became renowned for re-engineering police work, targeting gang violence, and putting more cops in neighborhoods.

What also makes him an ideal candidate for president is his military record. Bratton is a United States Army veteran who served in Vietnam. He began his police work in Boston in 1970 and became the Superintendent of Police there in just 10 years.

His new consulting gig in England will be a good fit: He was recently honored by Great Britain's Queen Elizabeth II with the honorary title of Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (CBE).