The term “computer age” seems archaic today, simply because computer technology has become so dispersed and integrated with everything else. Much computer technology is now essentially invisible to the user, buried in functionalities and automated services that we take for granted. In effect, it is allowing us to impart intelligence to processes, increasing efficiencies and reducing waste in ways never before possible. Today, efficiencies based upon intelligence can mean the difference between success and failure, and nowhere is this truer than in the rapidly changing hospitality industry.

There was a time when a hotel room had little more than two beds and a Bible, but competition and the demand for entertainment eventually made in-room television a standard feature. Black-and-white gave way to color and small screens became large screens, but the basic rules of the game remained essentially the same. You sat down and flipped through the channels until you found something of interest, or, if you were willing to spend a little money, you could pay for video-on-demand.

To the hotel owner, it all represented a nagging, if necessary, expense; something you had to give the consumer to get them in the door. Thanks to companies like Tivus, Inc., however, that model is starting to go the way of the TV antenna. Tivus, a hospitality entertainment technology company, is doing everything it can to move the industry to the bold new platform of IPTV (Internet Protocol Television). IPTV not only addresses problematic security issues common in old technology legacy systems, it offers a totally new world of scalable two-way communication and data capturing, essentially bringing intelligence to a previously limited part of the hospitality experience.

Because of IPTV’s ability to sense and effectively turn off channels that are not currently being watched, it makes far more efficient use of bandwidth, allowing guests a huge selection of channels and options. It also provides more flexibility in presentation, so that, for example, a Japanese guest could see the Japanese channels at the top of the list. Also, since IPTV standards are global in nature, it’s easier and less costly for worldwide hotel chains to adopt a single solution. The Tivus system architecture allows traffic to be analyzed as guests access the network, capturing behavioral, geographical, and seasonal factors, allowing advertisers to better focus their presentations as well. In addition, guests can interact, requesting more information when needed.

A key advantage to the Tivus solution is the company’s revenue sharing advertising program, allowing a hotel to install ultra-modern HD flat screen televisions at potentially no capital expenditure, making it easy for the industry to transition to a new level of intelligent hospitality.

For more information, visit the company’s website at www.Tivus.com

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