University Of Florida Plans To Remove All Reminders Of Aaron Hernandez From Campus By End Of July

on July 25 2013 8:49 PM
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Aaron Hernandez (81) played tight end for the University of Florida. The school is now looking to completely remove his name and image from any campus facilities. Reuters

Aaron Hernandez's University of Florida football achievements will soon be only a distant memory on campus.

The disgraced former New England Patriots tight end is currently locked up in a Massachusetts jail, waiting for his trial in connection with the murder of his friend. And the University of Florida isn't too proud of their former star player's recent headline grabbing tale. 

Read More: Aaron Hernandez Told Friend He Fired Fatal Shots In Odin Lloyd Killing, Say Police

So in an attempt to separate itself from the troubled player, the university has kicked off a plan to remove both his name and image from numerous locations across the campus, specifically at the school's football facility. 

RTX8I2L Aaron Hernandez captures a touchdown pass from quarterback Tim Tebow in the first quarter of play against the University of Miami in their NCAA football game in Gainesville, Florida.  Reuters

On Thursday morning, July 25, they removed one of Hernandez's most prized college accomplishments, his All-American brick. He was an All-American tight end for the Gators in 2009.

The brick was replaced with a blank slab. 

In a statement the university said they no longer felt "it was appropriate to celebrate Aaron Hernandez.” 

“We put together an immediate plan after the initial news broke to remove his likeness and name in various private and public areas in the facility," the statement said. “We were able to implement some of the changes immediately and this [brick removal] was a more complex process to complete with our vendors."

Everything is expected to be completed by the end of July. 

Hernandez appeared in court on July 24, and that was his first time in court since his hearing on June 28. During the hearing, prosecutors were given a 30-day continuance even though Hernandez's attorney wanted the hearing to continue, reports the Washington Post.

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