The London Games completed its second-to-last day of events, and there were a couple of surprises.

The most prominent event on Saturday was men's soccer. Brazil entered the final in front of over 80,000 spectators at Wembley Stadium as the favorite, but was upset by Mexico, 2-1. Hulk scored for Brazil in the final moments of the match, and an errant header by an unmarked Oscar would have evened the match just before the final whistle.

But the day belonged to Mexico, as the country earned their first-ever gold medal in the event. Oribe Peralta scored in just 29 seconds into the match, which is the fastest-ever Olympic goal, and the 28-year-old forward would score another goal off a header.

Usain Bolt went three-for-three, as Jamaica earned gold in the 4x100 relay. Jamaica was a favorite, but it was a bit of a surprise that their quartet shattered the world record with a time of 36.84 seconds. Bolt's third gold was a fitting way to cap a memorable Olympics.

The U.S. came in second as Trell Kimmons, Justin Gatlin, Tyson Gay and Ryan Bailey clocked in at 37.04, which was the same time as Jamaica in the 2011 world championships. Trinidad and Tobago earned the bronze in 38.12, while Canada was disqualified for running outside their lane.

The U.S  women won gold in the 4x400 with a time of 3:16.87, which was more than three seconds better than the second-place finisher, Russia. The bronze went to Jamaica.

Mariya Savinova, of Russia, won the gold in the women's 800-meter dash. She was followed by South Africa's Caster Semenya and Ekaterina Poistogova, who is also Russian.

In diving, American David Boudia earned the gold with a score of 568.65. Qui Bo of China took the silver, while Great Britain's Thomas Daley took the bronze in a tight finish.

Finally, in a surprise to very few, the U.S. women earned gold in women's basketball. The Americans defeated France in convincing fashion, 86-50. With a 19-0 run in the third quarter, the U.S. were able to break the game open. Candace Parker scored 21 points and grabbed 11 rebounds for the U.S.

It was the fifth-consecutive gold medal for the U.S. women.

"It just shows the depth and talent in our country. Women's basketball, it's our sport -- it's our sport," said Diana Taurasi, after the win. "We grew up playing since we were little and give it every single little bit of energy we have."